October 14, 2021

Worship at Central will continue on Sunday, October 17, both in-person and by Zoom meeting.

October 24th will be our new minister, Brad Inglis’ first Sunday with us. Until that time we will enjoy services conducted by guest speakers, some from Central and a few familiar faces from past years.

Rev. Jim Balfour will be the guest speaker for this Sunday’s service. Jim will do some reminiscing about his time at Central as part of our 200 year Anniversary celebrations. Don’t miss this service!

A prerecorded on-line version of the weekly Sunday service will NOT be available until further notice. We will make the recorded “zoom” version available to you later non Sunday afternoon.

You will receive a Zoom meeting invitation from Kathy Steiner by Saturday evening so you can stay in the comfort of your home instead of meeting in person.

Covid-19 protocols will continue when we are meeting in person. This means you must wear your face mask at all times when in the church. You will be met at inside the door and asked the standard Covid questions, then move along the hall and register your name with Sue for future contact tracing. Remember to maintain a distance of 6 ft between you and the next person in the pew, unless they are from your “bubble”.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement
Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us
Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

October 7, 2021

Worship at Central will continue on Sunday, October 10, both in-person and by Zoom meeting.

October 24th will be our new minister, Brad Inglis’ first Sunday with us. Until that time we will enjoy services conducted by guest speakers, some from Central and a few familiar faces from past years.

The Outreach Committee will be the guest speakers for this Sunday’s service. Support this team by attending in-person or online. They have a great message to share with us.

This weekend is Thanksgiving and time to give thanks for the many good things we have. It is also time to remember those less fortunate. If you are able, bring something to be donated to the WAES foodbank. Leave your items on the bench outside the Sanctuary.

A prerecorded on-line version of the weekly Sunday service will NOT be available until further notice. We will make the recorded “zoom” version available to you later non Sunday afternoon.

You will receive a Zoom meeting invitation from Kathy Steiner by Saturday evening so you can stay in the comfort of your home instead of meeting in person.

Covid-19 protocols will continue when we are meeting in person. This means you must wear your face mask at all times when in the church. Remember to maintain a distance of 6 ft between you and the next person in the pew, unless they are from your “bubble”.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement
Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us
Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

September 30, 2021

Worship at Central will continue on Sunday, October 3, both in-person and by Zoom meeting.

October 24th will be our new minister, Brad Inglis’ first Sunday with us. Until that time we will enjoy services conducted by guest speakers, some from Central and a few familiar faces from past years.

This week’s guest speaker will be Dr. Jim Rodgerson.

A prerecorded on-line version of the weekly Sunday service will NOT be available until further notice. We will make the recorded “zoom” version available to you later on Sunday afternoon.

You will receive a Zoom meeting invitation from Kathy Steiner by Saturday evening so you can stay in the comfort of your home instead of meeting in person.

Covid-19 protocols will continue when we are meeting in person. This means you must wear your face mask at all times when in the church. Remember to maintain a distance of 6 ft between you and the next person in the pew, unless they are from your “bubble”.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement
Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us
Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

September 23, 2021

Worship at Central will continue on Sunday, September 26, both in-person and by Zoom meeting.

October 24th will be our new minister, Brad Inglis’ first Sunday with us. Until that time we will enjoy services conducted by guest speakers, some from Central and a few familiar faces from past years.

This week’s guest speaker will be Rev. David Watson.

This past week a few people have asked about the congregation singing the hymns in church. At this time the Province of Ontario still requests that singing is restricted to only a few individuals. I know that other churches have allowed singing during services and your executive board will discuss this at our next meeting.

A prerecorded on-line version of the weekly Sunday service will NOT be available until October 24th. We can however make the recorded “zoom” version available to you later on Sunday afternoon.

You will receive a Zoom meeting invitation from Kathy Steiner by Saturday evening so you can stay in the comfort of your home instead of meeting in person.

Covid-19 protocols will continue when we are meeting in person. This means you must wear your face mask at all times when in the church. Remember to maintain a distance of 6 ft between you and the next person in the pew, unless they are from your “bubble”.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement
Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us
Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

The middle of September

Worship at Central will continue on Sunday, September 19, both in-person and by Zoom meeting.

October 24th will be our new minister, Brad Inglis’ first Sunday with us. Until that time we will enjoy services conducted by guest speakers, some from Central and a few familiar faces from past years. This week’s guest speaker will be Taye Madison.

A prerecorded on-line version of the weekly Sunday service will NOT be available until October 24th. We can however make the recorded “zoom” version available to you later on Sunday afternoon.

You will receive a Zoom meeting invitation from Kathy Steiner by Saturday evening so you can stay in the comfort of your home instead of meeting in person.

Covid-19 protocols will continue when we are meeting in person. This means you must wear your face mask at all times when in the church. Remember to maintain a distance of 6 ft between you and the next person in the pew, unless they are from your “bubble”.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

About this Blast
Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement
Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us
Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Let’s gather in person again

Worship at Central will resume on Sunday, September 12, both in-person and by Zoom meeting.

October 24th will be our new minister, Brad Inglis’ first Sunday with us. Until that time we will enjoy services conducted by guest speakers, some from Central and a few familiar faces from past years. This week’s guest speaker will be Marg “Bunny” Todman, assisted by Dave Hewitt.

A prerecorded on-line version of the weekly Sunday service will NOT be available until October 24th. We can however make the recorded “zoom” version available to you later on Sunday afternoon. Please let Kathy Steiner know if you want that link sent to you.

You will receive a Zoom meeting invitation from Kathy Steiner by Saturday evening if you would prefer to stay at home instead of meeting in person.

Covid-19 protocols will continue when we are meeting in person. This means you must wear your face mask at all times when in the church. Remember to maintain a distance of 6 ft between you and the next person in the pew, unless they are from your “bubble”.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.


About this Blast
Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement
Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.


Contact Us
Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Summer 2021

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Summer worship with Weston Presbyterian Church.  The second half of worship this summer (August 1 to September 5) will be hosted and led by WPC. We are grateful for this ongoing partnership. Dr. Odland has requested that you send your email address directly to him, and he will add you to the list for the remaining summer services. His email is lance@westonpresbyterian.ca

Worship at Central will resume on Sunday, September 12. Details of the service will be posted here, and emailed to everyone on the blast list.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Photo by Joyce Klamer

More Announcements

Part of a note we received from Diana Stapleton, Chair of WAES: “We are so appreciative of your generous ongoing donations, and for all the other amazing support we have received from the church. This type of consistent donation certainly helps us plan our purchases. It also show we have people who care about the community, month in and month out. It means a lot to all of us at WAES.”

Worship at Central

Services at Central will resume on Sunday, September 12.

Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Reconciliation

This week, a message from the Moderator of the United Church of Canada addressed to Residential School Survivors, Families, and Communities: 

I want to acknowledge the pain that you, as survivors of residential schools, families, and communities, are experiencing. We understand that the pain endured at these schools went far beyond their walls and grounds into community and through generations.

The United Church of Canada operated 15 residential schools: Alberni, Ahousaht, Coqualeetza, Kitimaat (Elizabeth Long Memorial Home), and Port Simpson (Crosby Boys’ and Girls’ Home) in BC; Edmonton, McDougall Orphanage/Morley, and Red Deer in Alberta; Cote (formerly Crowstand), File Hills, and Round Lake in Saskatchewan; Brandon, Norway House, and Portage la Prairie in Manitoba; and Mount Elgin in Ontario. We are aware of cemeteries on some of these sites, and we know that there are also unmarked and likely undocumented graves of children.

We acknowledge that our role in the residential school system and colonization is an abuse of power through our Christian faith. We hope that our ongoing work for reconciliation, which has been guided by United Church residential school survivors, more truly reflects what our faith calls us to be and do. We are committed to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, especially those directed to us as perpetrators. These include those related to burial sites and missing children.

In the spirit of truth telling and transparency, we want to share the work that we have done, in consultation with community, on identifying and restoring graveyards. The United Church in southwestern Manitoba has actively supported ongoing work on the identification and preservation of gravesites related to the residential school in Brandon; this includes the 104 graves identified off-site in 2018. In Saskatchewan, we supported the community of Okanese in preserving its graveyard and honouring the children buried there. The United Church of Canada has also been a partner in the preservation of the Regina Industrial School cemetery. (Regina was operated by the Presbyterian church, but the United Church shares responsibility.) United Churches in Red Deer, Alberta, worked to preserve the residential school cemetery in cooperation with the communities whose children were sent to Red Deer. There has also been research into possible graves at the Edmonton Residential School.

This work is just a beginning, and we understand that it must continue. Steps are required to properly locate, identify, and honour these children, and for the truth that Indigenous people have always known to finally be heard. Any work we do to help search grounds of and surrounding United Church residential schools must be done with respect for, the consent of, and with the guidance of Indigenous leadership, communities, survivors, and families. We know that we are not the experts in this work. We will continue to share all the documents and knowledge we have. If anyone in community wishes to share information and expertise with us, we will gratefully accept it and be committed to transparency.

We are committed to meeting with leadership to hear how they wish to proceed, and whether they would like our assistance at any stage. This includes financial assistance for what community leadership deems appropriate.

The United Church of Canada is committed to reconciliation and to transparency in our efforts to support Indigenous leadership, communities, survivors, and families in bringing these children the honour we denied them in life.

With respect,
The Right Rev. Dr. Richard Bott
Moderator

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Read “The History of Central United Church” (1996) by Eric Lee.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has published “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” Contact the church at cuc@bellnet.ca to obtain a copy of her book.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

July 22, 2021

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This will be the last blast for a while, and I want to express my thanks to everyone who made this unique form of communication possible. Our blast “staff” includes writers, photographers, link-suggesters, announcement providers, and helpful refinement-makers. We went from a rather primitive little blast/site in 2008 to the format you see today. Together, our blast team has kept the congregation informed, inspired, and prepared for Sunday worship. Thank you all, and special thanks to our readers!

Preparing for Sunday with some of the notes shared by the organizing team: The service will be limited to 75 attendees. You will be required to wear your mask, sign in when you arrive, and answer a handful of screening questions. Seating in the sanctuary will be in twos and threes, and larger families are encouraged to follow this guideline as well. After the service, there will be a brief presentation and a metaphorical “toast” to Michael and Carmen. There will also be a book to sign.

Congratulations to Kori and Dan on the birth of baby Jamie, born on Monday night. And congratulations to new grandmother Jenny!

Preparing for August 1 with Weston Presbyterian Church. Dr. Odland has requested that you send your email address directly to him, and he will add you to the list for the remaining summer services (August 1 to September 5). His email is lance@westonpresbyterian.ca

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible. What seemed a short assignment continued for six months!

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Photo by Joyce Klamer

More Announcements

We were saddened to learn of the death of Don Lynn, longtime and beloved member of Mount Dennis United Church. While his field was information technology, his real passion was volunteering. Read about him here.

Part of a note we received from Diana Stapleton, Chair of WAES: “We are so appreciative of your generous ongoing donations, and for all the other amazing support we have received from the church. This type of consistent donation certainly helps us plan our purchases. It also show we have people who care about the community, month in and month out. It means a lot to all of us at WAES.”More from the note we received from Diana Stapleton, Chair of WAES:

Our friends at Shakespeare in Action are hosting a weekend of free, outdoor performances featuring Weston Silver Band, Rebanks and Alphonse by Wajdi Mouawad presented by Theaturtle. From July 29 to August 1, there will be free, live performances of music or dance. All safety protocols issued by the Province of Ontario and the City of Toronto will be in place. Therefore, they ask that you pre-register for this event and arrive at least 10-15 minutes before the performance begins. Learn more (and register) here.

Worship at Central

If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 10 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 145: “All your works shall give thanks to you, O LORD, and all your faithful shall bless you.”

Ephesians 3.14-21: “I pray that, according to the riches of his glory, he may grant that you may be strengthened in your inner being with power through his Spirit.

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Reconciliation

This week, a message from the Moderator of the United Church of Canada addressed to Residential School Survivors, Families, and Communities:

I want to acknowledge the pain that you, as survivors of residential schools, families, and communities, are experiencing. We understand that the pain endured at these schools went far beyond their walls and grounds into community and through generations.

The United Church of Canada operated 15 residential schools: Alberni, Ahousaht, Coqualeetza, Kitimaat (Elizabeth Long Memorial Home), and Port Simpson (Crosby Boys’ and Girls’ Home) in BC; Edmonton, McDougall Orphanage/Morley, and Red Deer in Alberta; Cote (formerly Crowstand), File Hills, and Round Lake in Saskatchewan; Brandon, Norway House, and Portage la Prairie in Manitoba; and Mount Elgin in Ontario. We are aware of cemeteries on some of these sites, and we know that there are also unmarked and likely undocumented graves of children.

We acknowledge that our role in the residential school system and colonization is an abuse of power through our Christian faith. We hope that our ongoing work for reconciliation, which has been guided by United Church residential school survivors, more truly reflects what our faith calls us to be and do. We are committed to the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, especially those directed to us as perpetrators. These include those related to burial sites and missing children.

In the spirit of truth telling and transparency, we want to share the work that we have done, in consultation with community, on identifying and restoring graveyards. The United Church in southwestern Manitoba has actively supported ongoing work on the identification and preservation of gravesites related to the residential school in Brandon; this includes the 104 graves identified off-site in 2018. In Saskatchewan, we supported the community of Okanese in preserving its graveyard and honouring the children buried there. The United Church of Canada has also been a partner in the preservation of the Regina Industrial School cemetery. (Regina was operated by the Presbyterian church, but the United Church shares responsibility.) United Churches in Red Deer, Alberta, worked to preserve the residential school cemetery in cooperation with the communities whose children were sent to Red Deer. There has also been research into possible graves at the Edmonton Residential School.

This work is just a beginning, and we understand that it must continue. Steps are required to properly locate, identify, and honour these children, and for the truth that Indigenous people have always known to finally be heard. Any work we do to help search grounds of and surrounding United Church residential schools must be done with respect for, the consent of, and with the guidance of Indigenous leadership, communities, survivors, and families. We know that we are not the experts in this work. We will continue to share all the documents and knowledge we have. If anyone in community wishes to share information and expertise with us, we will gratefully accept it and be committed to transparency.

We are committed to meeting with leadership to hear how they wish to proceed, and whether they would like our assistance at any stage. This includes financial assistance for what community leadership deems appropriate.

The United Church of Canada is committed to reconciliation and to transparency in our efforts to support Indigenous leadership, communities, survivors, and families in bringing these children the honour we denied them in life.

With respect,
The Right Rev. Dr. Richard Bott
Moderator

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “The History of Central United Church” (1996) by Eric Lee:

The third [and current] building was opened on December 18, 1887, when the Rev. R. Large was minister. The Christian Guardian reports the special preachers for the occasion being Rev. Dr. Harper, District Chairman, in the morning; Rev. J.W. McCallum, a former pastor, in the afternoon; and in the evening the Rev. R. Boyle of Brampton preached to “an overflowing house.”

The church seated approximately 460. Two entrances off King Street, reached by a dozen fairly wide steps led through the base of each spire up short flights of stairs directly into the main auditorium.

Side aisles sloped down to the south end where the pulpit platform and choir loft were elevated considerably above floor level. A communion rail formed a semicircle in front of the pulpit. The choir accommodation for about 35 was in three rows, two on either side of the organ and one behind it, facing the congregation.

A small pipe organ was replaced in 1911 by a Warren 12-stop organ at a cost of $1,850.00. This instrument had an electric pump but there was a hand pump behind the choir loft which was often called into use when the power failed. Prior to the installation of the electric pump it was manually operated.

Minutes of the October, 1893, meeting of the Trustees record a discussion concerning the appointment of a boy for pumping the church organ and the Church Steward was authorized to appoint one, subject to the approval of the Board. It was later recorded that one was obtained for $12.00 per year! Unfortunately, he was not named.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the “voice” of someone who has experienced homelessness.

I’m an alcoholic, which could be thought of as a mental illness, but others out here are homeless because they are mentally ill. Many homeless people have untreated schizophrenia, so they hallucinate. They hear voices, often mean ones, I think. I listen to them talking to themselves or the voices in their heads who can tell them to do scary things. Bipolar is another hard one – up one day and down another. I’ve seen them sitting on their beds crying and crying. Lots of us have depression. Who wouldn’t, living the way we do, not knowing if we’ll have food or somewhere to sleep, or the cops will decide to rough you up for loitering? I just want a little dignity shown to me. To be treated like I was when I was the boss. I don’t get why people are nice if they think the person is rich, but not if they are poor. Do you want to help? Treat us with compassion.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

July 15, 2021

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Part of a note we received from Diana Stapleton, Chair of WAES: “We are so appreciative of your generous ongoing donations, and for all the other amazing support we have received from the church. This type of consistent donation certainly helps us plan our purchases. It also show we have people who care about the community, month in and month out. It means a lot to all of us at WAES.”

Taye sent along the following: As you are aware, Michael’s final service is fast approaching. A committee has been busy preparing for a one-time-only face-to-face service on Sunday, July 25 at 10 am, to send him off. However, due to Covid restrictions, attendance is limited. If you are hoping to attend the service in person, we ask that you please complete this form to RSVP: https://forms.gle/Ls6ZSWeAYXK6UHCr6

You will be notified via email to confirm your attendance. The service will also be broadcast via ZOOM as per usual.

Summer services continue with six Sundays “at” Central (June 20 to July 25). We then shift to Weston Presbyterian Church for the remaining six Sundays (August 1 to September 5). All services begin at 10 am. Central’s summer services will follow the now familiar format, with an online service and Zoom worship (with the addition of WPC) at 10 am. There is a slight chance of in-person worship, so we will keep you posted.

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

Thanks to Judith for sending along the following: This Saturday July 17, ActiveTO is coming to York South Weston! As part of ActiveTO, Black Creek Drive will be opened up for people to walk, run, or cycle between Trethewey and Lawrence from 6 am and 9 pm. Come on out with family and friends! ActiveTO also send along a photo from the Allen Road event last month (below).

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 23: “The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not want.

Mark 6:30-34, 53-56: “Come away to a deserted place all by yourselves and rest a while.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Reconciliation

Barbara Bisgrove sent along a number of articles related to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. This article reviews books Barbara has read to improve her knowledge of Indigenous peoples.

[Warning: Some disturbing content]

“Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death and Hard Truths in a Northern City” by Tanya Talaga. Of all the books this one had the most indelible effect. Any mention of Thunder Bay and I see the images Talaga’s words placed in my mind of police and Indigenous people near the river. I finally understood the challenges facing these Canadian teenagers, and the dreadful sadness of their story.

From 2000 to 2011, seven indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay. They were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home because there was no high school on their reserves. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the -20 Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water.

Tanya is Ojibwe with roots in Fort William First Nation in Ontario, Canada. She worked as a journalist at the Toronto Star for more than twenty years, and has been nominated five times for the Michener Award in public service journalism. Talaga holds an honorary Doctor of Letters from Lakehead University in Thunder Bay.

She is also the President and CEO of Makwa Creative, a production company focused on Indigenous storytelling. Spirit to Soar, Mashkawi-manidoo bimaadiziwin, is a one-hour documentary inspired by Tanya Talaga’s book, Seven Fallen Feathers. The film looks at how the book came to Talaga, when she travelled to Thunder Bay as a newspaper journalist on a federal election assignment, but discovered instead the story of seven First Nations high school students who had either died or gone missing.

Central at 200

May be an image of outdoors
Photo from the Weston Historical Society

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “The History of Central United Church” (1996) by Eric Lee:

William Watson Sr. who was a school teacher and later Superintendent of Schools in York Township, lived for a number of years until his death in 1883 in Weston, in a house on Church Street at the end of what Dr. Watson says they used to call “Catholic Lane.”

This was in all probability George Street and the house was very likely one of those demolished in 1961 to make way for the erection of an apartment building on the north side of Church Street opposite George Street. William Watson, in addition to being Sunday School Superintendent, was a Local Preacher and also conducted a Sunday morning Class Meeting in the basement of the old church for many years. He was an active member of the Good Templar’s Lodge which also met in the church basement. His home was always open to the young ministers of the circuit, who preached at Weston but who lived at Woodbridge.

According to Dr. Tyrrell, our second church was built by his father, the “Squire” referred to by Dr. Watson. In 1875, following a fire which burned the Grammar School on King Street, classes were held in the basement of this church. The newly appointed principal at that time was Mr. George Wallace, B.A., formerly a teacher at Upper Canada College, and he lived with Mr. William Tyrrell.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the firsthand experience of someone who has experienced homelessness.

Some drop-ins do free haircuts, but you’ve got to be there on the right day. When I’m cleaned up, counsellors will say, “You did it once. Why not try getting back into business?” But I don’t believe I could. I would just drink away the start-up money. That’s my destination, to drink away every chance I get until I die under some concrete bridge. Alone. That scares me.  It’s alright being alone when I know what’s going on, then I can defend myself. But the idea of being sick and knowing death is coming is scary. I hope whoever finds my body can get in touch with my wife, so she can say she’s a widow, not whatever story she makes up now to account for my absence. Would anyone bury me, do you think, and say a kind word?

In the shelter there was a guy who said to me, “I am sick and tired of always being broke.  I found myself unemployed. I lived off my credit cards for nine months hoping things would get better. I eventually lost my house to foreclosure, and because I acquired huge credit card debt, I’m in a way still paying the mortgage on the house I lost. My last good-paying job was in 2018, and that lasted only three months before they laid me off along with 49 others. I am grateful for my homeless shelter job because any of us who have a job should feel lucky, but I don’t think I’ll ever make a living-wage that will get me out of my financial crisis. This is not how I dreamed my adult years would be.”

Summer isn’t so bad for the homeless.  Places to sleep, like Out of the Cold, close, but there are some nice spots in the parks where you can hide quite well and enjoy a warm night under the stars. Sometimes I’ll pick up a newspaper someone left on a bench – they are good insulation under you – and I’ll read the business section and think about what I left behind. I read reviews of movies, programs on TV and feel bummed I’ll never see them. The library is a great place to go because they let you stay there much of the day. You can read the magazines and newspapers if you don’t bother anyone.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

July 8, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png
Perfect summer picture from Cathy Leask

Taye sent along the following: As you are aware, Michael’s final service is fast approaching. A committee has been busy preparing for a one-time-only face-to-face service on Sunday, July 25 at 10 am, to send him off. However, due to Covid restrictions, attendance is limited. If you are hoping to attend the service in person, we ask that you please complete this form to RSVP: https://forms.gle/Ls6ZSWeAYXK6UHCr6

You will be notified via email to confirm your attendance. The service will also be broadcast via ZOOM as per usual.

The Chair of your Church Council, Kathy Steiner, send along the following update regarding the pastoral search: “The search team has completed the position description for a supply minister and have posted it on the United Church Hub website where potential candidates can apply.  We will keep you updated of all changes.” Thank you Kathy and Church Council Executive members.

Summer services continue with six Sundays “at” Central (June 20 to July 25). We then shift to Weston Presbyterian Church for the remaining six Sundays (August 1 to September 5). All services begin at 10 am. Central’s summer services will follow the now familiar format, with an online service and Zoom worship (with the addition of WPC) at 10 am. There is a slight chance of in-person worship, so we will keep you posted.

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Tiger lilies at Six Mile Lake by Donna Latimer

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 24: “The earth is the Lord’s and all that is in it, the world, and those who live in it.

Luke 14.1-14: “On one occasion when Jesus was going to the house of a leader of the Pharisees to eat a meal on the sabbath, they were watching him closely.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Reconciliation

Barbara Bisgrove sent along a number of articles related to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. This article reviews books Barbara has read to improve her knowledge of Indigenous peoples.

“From the Ashes. My Story of Being Metis, Homeless, and Finding my Way” by Jesse Thistle: Jesse’s story is not a happy one. I did not have good feelings reading it, only sadness about what humans can do to each other. He is Metis-Cree from Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, now living in Toronto as assistant professor of Metis Studies at York University.

To quote CBC, George Canyon “From the Ashes is a remarkable memoir about hope and resilience, and a revelatory look into the life of a Métis-Cree man who refused to give up. Abandoned by his parents as a toddler, Jesse Thistle briefly found himself in the foster-care system with his two brothers, cut off from all they had known. Eventually the children landed in the home of their paternal grandparents, whose tough-love attitudes quickly resulted in conflicts. Throughout it all, the ghost of Jesse’s drug-addicted father haunted the halls of the house and the memories of every family member. Struggling with all that had happened, Jesse succumbed to a self-destructive cycle of drug and alcohol addiction and petty crime, spending more than a decade on and off the streets, often homeless. Finally, he realized he would die unless he turned his life around.”

Jesse says “If you look through the book, you’ll see flashes of light every time I was traumatized. The way that my mind works, it’s like looking through a shard of broken glass, with all the different light fragments. I can only capture them in one- and two-page memories because they either score my soul and I bleed too much, or I can’t remember because my mind blocks it out.”

“The Marrow Thieves” by Cherie Dimaline: This is an award-winning book for teens, and I agree with those who recognized it’s power. Cherie Dimaline, the first Aboriginal Writer in Residence for the Toronto Public Library, is a Metis whose fiction has been published world-wide.

I will quote from her forepage: “ The way to kill a man or a nation is to cut off his dreams, the way the whites are taking care of the Indians, killing their dreams, their magic, and their familiar spirits.” William S. Burroughs.

This is a science fiction, survival novel set in a Canada plagued by ecological disasters. Here government recruiters harvest bone marrow from Indigenous people believing they have dreams woven into the marrow and the non-Indigenous population have forgotten how to dream.

The storyteller is a young Metis boy called Frenchie, who is being hunted, and manages to join a group of people also on the run. An older Anishinaabe man takes the leadership role. He is suffering trauma after losing his husband to the recruiters. There are fights, people join the group and others leave, there is hardship with travelling and camping, and Frenchie falls in love with Rose.

Fortunately, it is not a long book – 234 pages – because I could not put it down. The last words are: “And I understood that as long as there were dreamers left, there will never be want for a dream. And I understood just what we would do for each other, just what we would do with the ebb and pull of the dream, the bigger dream that held us all. Anything. Everything.”

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “The History of Central United Church” (1996) by Eric Lee:

Dr. Watson, at the time of his writing, was Professor of Hebrew at Pine Hill Divinity Hall, Halifax, N.S. He states that both his father and his grandfather, Christopher Watson, were buried in the Methodist Cemetery here. 

Speaking of this brick building, Dr. Watson comments: “I well remember the Wesleyan Chapel which was in use when I was a boy. It was a plain rectangular building with a basement where the Sunday School was held. It  faced on Main Street.  A grey stone with the name “Wesleyan Chapel A.D. 1849’ was set into the brick immediately above the door. Steps went up the wall from each side of the door and immediately underneath steps went down into the basement. The basement was partially beneath the ground and in wet weather water often lay upon the floor. The church was plainly furnished but was comfortable and usually well filled with worshippers. The pulpit was high up on the Eastern wall, and approached by steps. In front of the pulpit and beneath it was the Communion Table surrounded by a railing. At the back of the church (the west end) the Choir sat on a slightly raised platform. There was a door on the south side of the pulpit, opening out on the Cemetery, and on a summer day, when this door was open, it was a pleasant sight to look out upon the peaceful scene—the stones, the green grass, the trees and shrubs. Squire Tyrrell and his family used to sit in a side pew near this door.”

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the firsthand experience of someone who has experienced homelessness.

Summer is still to come, but now it is spring, so by noon I hope it will have warmed up a bit. It is a long day of survival ahead. Earlier in the week, in the jostling to get off a bus I was able to lift some guy’s wallet. That got me some cash for a bottle of whiskey, and I had a solo party with my memories. Today I’ll stand outside the liquor store and trust someone will take pity on me. Occasionally I’m lucky and meet a guy who is already drunk, out to pick up some more liquor and not thinking straight, so he gives me a ten or a twenty, not realizing what he’s doing.

My joints ache from sleeping on the ground and I need to find someone who will cut my toenails. When you walk about with wet boots and no socks you get foot infections. I could use a haircut too. I look wild which puts people off giving me money. As another guy said to me, his wish would be for people to see him and not look away when they pass him on the street. “They don’t see me; they see that stigma. They think I’m violent, I’m strange, I’m different — I’m just simple. I need someone to help me.”

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove