June 10, 2021

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Read The United Church response to the recent attack in London, Ontario. In addition, our Moderator, the Rt. Rev. Richard Bott shared the following prayer:

Tonight, I join with many across Canada to condemn the act of religiously motivated hatred and violence that took place in London, Ontario, on Sunday – the murder of a Muslim family and an act of terror against Islam. Let us be with all those who mourn. Let us use all that we have and all that we are to stand in the face of the evil that would allow and cause this crime of hatred. Even as one man has been arrested for his actions, let us uncover and work against the beliefs, the worldview, the racism and the hatred that supported his choice. May the Most Compassionate and Most Merciful God dwell with those who have died in paradise, and give patience and blessing to those who mourn through this time of trial.

This Sunday! The Church School picnic has gone virtual! We’re planning a Zoom picnic on Sunday, June 13 at 11.30 am. There will be games, singing, and a pet show! Plan ahead and gather a pencil and some paper, and food if you wish.

Plan ahead!  Summer services begin with six Sundays “at” Central (June 20 to July 25) and ends with six Sundays at Weston Presbyterian Church (August 1 to September 5). All services begin at 10 am. Central’s summer services will follow the now familiar format, with an online service and Zoom worship (with the addition of WPC) at 10 am. There is a slight chance of in-person worship, so we will keep you posted.

Their cup runneth over! WKNC has paused clothing/other item donations for the time being. Seems lots of generous folks have been spring cleaning.

Speaking of WKNC, there is a vacancy on the Board of Directors for a faith-based nominee. If you are interested, please speak to Michael or Wendy Whiteley.

Celebrate Pride Month! The City of Toronto has created a page dedicated to Pride Month, including a 2021 Pride Month proclamation, milestones, and a section on how to improve 2SLGBTQ+ inclusion. Visit the page here.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (June 13) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 20: “The LORD answer you in the day of trouble! The name of the God of Jacob protect you!”

Mark 4.26-34: “With many such parables he spoke the word to them, as they were able to hear it.

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Reconciliation

Barbara Bisgrove sent along a number of articles related to reconciliation with Indigenous peoples. This article provides background on the formation of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

The Canadian Government set up the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2008. Its primary purpose is documenting the history and impacts of the Canadian Residential School System. Truth and Reconciliation reveals the long and painful history behind Canada’s treatment of Indigenous peoples.

Before Europeans arrived, First Nations peoples lived on the land we now know as Canada for thousands of years. They hunted for their food and migrated to different areas of land depending on the time of the year. Each group had its own government and traditions and different groups had their own agreements among each other so they could coexist peacefully on the land.

When the Europeans arrived, they began trade relations with the First Nations peoples. The First Nations traded their animal furs for all kinds of materials including tools, cloth, and pottery. Relations between the Europeans and First Nations continued to grow and alliances began to form.

Later, these alliances were solidified through the signing of treaties, which were official agreements between Europeans and certain First Nations.

The Canadian Government set up the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2008. Its primary purpose is documenting the history and impacts of the Canadian Residential School System. Truth and Reconciliation reveals the long and painful history behind Canada’s treatment of Indigenous peoples.

Although the Europeans and First Nations signed the same documents, both sides had very different views on what the treaties actually meant.

A procession from Weston Presbyterian Church passes Central in 1912. The southeast face (without a chancel) would remain unchanged until 1938. Image from the Weston Historical Society.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “The History of Central United Church” (1996) by Eric Lee:

One story built around the personal history of Mr. James Lever (one of our founders) sets 1812 as the year in which that ardent Methodist, an immigrant from Lancashire, England, commenced holding meetings and preaching services somewhat north of what was the northerly limit of the Town of Weston. This would be roughly in the vicinity of Weston Road and Wilson Avenue. However, in the obituary of James Lever in the September 1861 issue of The Christian Guardian, a Methodist publication of some years’ standing at that time, it was stated that Mr. Lever was born in England in 1769, was converted in 1815, and left England in 1817. He lived in Philadelphia for some few months and a son (Roger) was apparently born there in 1818. The Levers moved to Upper Canada that year and settled in “Little York”. Their names appear in Champion’s The Methodist Churches of Toronto (1899), and in Sanderson’s First Century of Methodism in Canada (1908),  in connection with the building of the first chapel on King Street (Toronto) on the site now occupied by the head office building of the Canadian Imperial  Bank of Commerce. 

Champion’s story sets the date of the opening service in this building as November 5th, 1818, at which time the preacher was the Reverend David Culp. He had been appointed to the Yonge Street Circuit in 1817and was also the first regular minister to serve the new Weston church. The first congregation in York was apparently connected with the American Methodist Episcopal Church and soon after the little chapel on King Street was opened, a number of Wesleyan Methodists, including the Levers, left it to hold their own meetings in the Masonic Hall. The Rev. Henry Pope, a Wesleyan Missionary from England, arrived in York in 1820 to minister to this little group but left again the same year. Some members of the Wesleyan Society as it was known, again including the Levers, returned to the King Street Chapel in that year. 

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the story of “Pete.”

Pete found himself frequently returning to parking lot bench to dream his dreams of a secure future for himself and others whose lives had collapsed. He showed his plan to people at the drop-in and received encouragement and help with the writing structure and which of a multitude of City departments would look at his plan and find him financial backers. As time passed, his plan’s pages began to get tattered and he spoke of it less frequently. Then, one day, the “For Sale” sign was taken down, and the next time he passed by a large container stood outside, filled with debris from the renovations that were occurring. Eventually, lawyers and their office staff moved in.

Pete dwelt on the feeling of unfairness, that the rich can find backers and raise money, whereas poor people like him, who may have dreams and knowledge, had little chance of starting an enterprise that would make them self-sufficient. There are inspiring stories of immigrants arriving with nothing who end up building commercial empires. But they are easily outnumbered by those who cannot find the means to rise above the poverty line. They face too many barriers.

The loss of his dream brought dark days for Pete, and the drinking and pain killers took over again. Drunk, staggering across a road, Pete was hit by a car and reinjured his shoulder, rendering him useless for casual labour or kitchen work. His liver is slowly failing, and he could see no hope of ever returning to his family. He now hides the bald spot with a buzz cut and has added a trim beard. On good days, he still plies his charm, kissing women’s hands, and using the romantic French accent to his advantage, but he is less exuberant and the twinkle in his eyes has left along with his dreams.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

June 3, 2021

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Kamloops Residential School Memorial, Vancouver. Photo by GoToVan (CC BY 2.0)

Rev. Murray Pruden, the United Church’s Executive Minister for Indigenous Ministries & Justice, shared the following Prayer for the Loss in Kamloops, BC

Creator, We give thanks for this day and each day you grant us life to walk on this great land, our Mother. Give us the heart and strength to come together in prayer in time of mourning, reflection, and peace.The news we have heard these last few days of our relations, our families, the children who have been physically taken away from us and who have now been found. And with this news, we grieve for their memory, for their struggle, for their spirit. We pray for good understanding, guidance, and love for all our families and communities who will need direction and resolution at this time. And we come together in prayer and ask for your light to guide us to be a part of that needed peace, support, and resolve for everyone who is reacting to this great tragedy in our Indigenous Nations of this great land. Creator be with us, allow us to be brave. Allow us to be strong. Allow us to be gentle to one another. Allow us to be humble. But most of all, allow us to be like the Creator’s love. Peace be with us, we lift up our prayers to you. In love, trust, and truth, peace be with us all. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

Zoom Communion! Join us (by phone or device) on Sunday, June 6 at 11 am for the Sacrament of Communion. Gather the elements before the service and join us. The Great Thanksgiving prayer will appear in the “static” online service.  Be as creative as you wish with the bread and “wine.”

Plan ahead!  Summer services begin with six Sundays “at” Central (June 20 to July 25) and ends with six Sundays at Weston Presbyterian Church (August 1 to September 5). All services begin at 10 am. Central’s summer services will follow the now familiar format, with an online service and Zoom worship (with the addition of WPC) at 10 am. There is a slight chance of in-person worship, so we will keep you posted.

Celebrate Pride Month! The City of Toronto has created a page dedicated to Pride Month, including a 2021 Pride Month proclamation, milestones, and a section on how to improve 2SLGBTQ+ inclusion. Visit the page here.

Save the date! The Church School picnic has gone virtual! We’re planning a Zoom picnic on Sunday, June 13 at 11.30 am. There will be games, and whatever picnic food you wish to eat. More details to follow.

Their cup runneth over! WKNC has paused clothing/other item donations for the time being. Seems lots of generous folks have been spring cleaning.

Speaking of WKNC, there is a vacancy on the Board of Directors for a faith-based nominee. If you are interested, please speak to Michael or Wendy Whiteley.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (June 6) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Liz Rodgerson sent along this photo of her Cinderella Plant (Night-blooming cereus).

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 138: “They shall sing of the ways of the LORD, for great is the glory of the LORD.”

2 Corinthians 4:13-5:1: “Because we look not at what can be seen but at what cannot be seen; for what can be seen is temporary, but what cannot be seen is eternal.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Water

Barbara Bisgrove shares more material on water, a recent focus for the Outreach Committee. This is part one of two, entitled “Ways for You to Save Water.”

Put Plastic Bottles or a Float Booster in Your Toilet Tank. To cut down on water waste, put an inch or two of sand or pebbles inside each of two plastic bottles. Fill the bottles with water, screw the lids on, and put them in your toilet tank, safely away from the operating mechanisms. Or buy an inexpensive tank bank or float booster. 

Shorten your showers. Use a kitchen timer to time your showers. Aim for five minutes or less. Showering accounts for almost 17 percent of household indoor water use — 40 gallons a day for the average family of four. Replace a regular showerhead with a water saving one.

Water by hand. Consider hand watering if you have a small garden area. House-holds that manually water with a hose typically use 33 percent less water outdoors than those that use an automatic irrigation system.

Don’t Run the Hose While Washing Your Car. Clean the car using a pail of soapy water. Use the hose only for rinsing; this simple practice can save as much as 100 gallons when washing a car. Use a spray nozzle when rinsing for more efficient use of water.

Use a Broom, Not a Hose, to Clean Driveways and Sidewalks. Blasting leaves or stains off your walkways with water is one way to remove them, but brushing with a broom to first loosen the dirt and grime will decrease your water use and save you time in the long run.

Get smart about irrigation.  Consider investing in weather-based irrigation controllers that adjust to real weather conditions and provide water only when needed. Replace older mist-style sprinkler heads with today’s newer, and more efficient, rotator sprinkler heads, which shoot jets of waters at a slow rate to increase penetration and eliminate drift. Install new drip irrigation piping and soaker hoses for improved watering efficiency.

Capture rainwater. Find ways to save and store rainwater for use in the garden. Remember to cover your barrels to keep mosquitoes at bay. Plants prefer untreated water, so your garden will be healthier while you cut your water bill.

Water During the Early Parts of the Day; Avoid Watering When It Is Windy
Early morning is generally better than dusk since it helps prevent the growth of fungus. Early watering and late watering also reduce water loss to evaporation. Watering early in the day is also the best defence against slugs and other garden pests. Try not to water when it’s windy: wind can blow sprinklers off target and speed evaporation.

Add Organic Matter to Your Garden Beds. Adding organic material to your soil will help increase its absorption and water retention. Areas that are already planted can be ‘top dressed’ with compost or organic matter every year. Turn a healthy dose of compost into new garden beds when preparing the soil for planting.

Use a Soil Moisture Meter to Gauge When You Should Water Your Garden
Avoid over- or under-watering your garden with a simple-to-use soil moisture meter. The meter quickly lets you know whether the soil is dry, so you only need to water when the plant actually needs it.

Control Weeds to Reduce Competition for Water in the Garden. Weeds use water, too! If you don’t weed, the garden invaders will take up water meant for your plants. A good layer of mulch around your plants not only conserves soil moisture but helps keep weeds under control.

Central’s Trail Rangers

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

In addition to Sunday School, midweek activities of various kinds have been provided for groups of all age levels for varying periods of time. One of the oldest of these must have been the Mission Band which was in operation early in the century. Although non existent for some years, there was some renewed interest after the 1957 re-opening. It served both girls and boys, as did also a successor group, the “Messengers.” The present organization for this junior age, “The Explorers,” is for girls only.

Central has been particularly fortunate in having able and adequate leadership through many years for its C.G.I.T. groups. This work commenced In the late 1920’s with Ev McCort, Lois Thompson, Elsie Wilcox and Maud Yeo as some of the leaders. Although this teenage girls organization has had its peaks and its valleys, they hold an enviable record among other churches in the area for size ad enthusiasm. The same cannot be said for boys work in spite of some dedicated leadership by a number of men. However, there have been over the years programs sponsored by Trail Ranger, Tuxis, Tyro and Sigma C groups; and more recently Cubs and Scouts which appear to be flourishing. Here again, while one would like to pay tribute by naming the people who have given of themselves in unselfish leadership, incomplete records ad limitations of space do not permit.

The older Young People have had their Christian Endeavour and Epworth League groups. These were succeeded In turn by the Young Peoples Society and the Young Peoples Union, but at the time of this writing there seems to be no active program for this age group. A Young Adult Group served the need of those somewhat older for some few years.

In this chapter reference should be made to the Church Tennis Club which flourished from 1921 until the late 30’s. During this period many honours in the Toronto Interchurch Tennis League were captured by our players. An attempt to re-activate this sport following the cessation of the 1939-1945 hostilities met with little success. Later, of course, the ground became part of the parking lot, and still later the site of our new East Wing.

A more modern activity, and one which would have probably caused the turning over of some of the venerable Methodist bones had they continued to rest in their original graves, was the by-weekly dance held by “Club Central.” These dances were for teenagers and took place on Saturday evenings during the Fall and Winter months. They were sponsored by the Christian Education Committee and operated by an enthusiastic group of our young people during the early 1960’s. Proceeds were invested in our present sound equipment, stage curtains, etc.

Some badminton has been played in the Church Hall, and another group which has made good use of this accommodation for some years is the “Co-Weds Club”. It has sponsored many interesting social activities including some square dancing.

Many outside organizations have enjoyed the use of various rooms and halls in our church building, including in many instances the catering facilities offered (at moderate cost) by our women’s groups. It is our hope and plan to continue and enlarge our service to the community in these and other ways.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the story of “Pete.”

The ground floor would bustle with a café, while the upstairs could house himself and the kitchen workers. He imagined three people in all – a dishwasher, one to prepare food and another to manage the cash register and purchase supplies. Responsibility for the latter would be his job at the start. He envisioned commuters rushing into the café to grab some breakfast before the train slid into the station. There could be prepaid cards to speed up service and rewards like free samples. Set up costs – coffee urns, milk and sugar containers, heatproof disposable mugs and stir sticks – would need budgeting. Once he was making a profit, he could expand to pre-made meals to be picked up as the commuters headed home. A fridge, a couple of sinks for both hand washing and dishwashing would all be needed. Was there a washroom on the ground floor of the house?

He needed to see the place for himself. How could he convince a real estate agent that he was a genuine buyer? He had yet to convince someone to fund his business plan – still incomplete, lacking an architectural plan of the house and a budget that included the property taxes, mortgage and insurance for the lodgers and the business. These were the things that inspired and challenged him, rekindling the sense of self.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

May 27, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png

Zoom Communion! Join us (by phone or device) on Sunday, June 6 at 11 am for the Sacrament of Communion. Gather the elements before the service and join us. The Great Thanksgiving prayer will appear in the “static” online service.

Plan ahead! Summer services begin with six Sundays “at” Central (June 20 to July 25) and ends with six Sundays at Weston Presbyterian Church (August 1 to September 5). All services begin at 10 am. Central’s summer services will follow the now familiar format, with an online service and Zoom worship (with the addition of WPC) at 10 am. There is a slight chance of in-person worship, so we will keep you posted.

Congratulations to Mary Louise Ashbourne, 2021 recipient of the Jean Hibbert Memorial Award. Presented by the Etobicoke Historical Society, the award recognizes outstanding contributions to historical awareness and heritage preservation in Etobicoke, Toronto or Ontario. Read the citation here.

Save the date! The Church School picnic has gone virtual! We’re planning a Zoom picnic on Sunday, June 13 at 11.30 am. There will be games, and whatever picnic food you wish to eat. More details to follow.

We were sad to learn of the passing of Joan Noble, former member of Central. Joan was a very active elder: Chair of the Christian Education Committee, Vice Chair of the Board, Chair of the Board, and Chair of the Outreach Committee. We pray for her family: Rev. Ken, Rev. Ruth, and John. You can read her full obituary at the Globe website.

The Christian Education/Picnic Planning Committee will meet on Sunday, May 30 at 12.30 pm (by Zoom). 

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (May 30) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 29: “Worship the LORD in holy splendor.”

Isaiah 6.1-8: “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I; send me!”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Focus on Water

Barbara Bisgrove shares more material on water, a recent focus for the Outreach Committee. This is part one of two, entitled “Ways for You to Save Water.”

“All the water that will ever be is, right now.” – National Geographic

Turn off faucets. Don’t let the water run needlessly as you wash or rinse dishes, wash your hands or face, brush your teeth or shave. Rinse vegetables in a stoppered sink or a pan of clean water. And fix leaks.

Keep a Bottle of Drinking Water in the Fridge: Running tap water to cool it off for drinking water is wasteful. Store drinking water in the fridge in a safe drinking bottle. Consider buying a personal water filter which enables users to drink water safely from rivers or lakes or any available body of water.

Use every drop. Learn to repurpose water. One easy way is to capture under your colander the potable water you use to rinse fruits and veggies and deposit it in the garden. Do the same while you wait for your hot water to come in.

Double-dip dishes. Instead of letting the water run while you wash dishes, fill one sink with hot, soapy water for washing, and the other with cool, clear water for rinsing.

Fit Household Faucets with Aerators. A simple low-flow aerator saves water in the bathroom, while a swiveling aerator can serve multiple purposes in the kitchen.

Consider a smaller dishwasher. Today’s modern, efficient dishwashers can save a great deal of water. Scrape dishes instead of rinsing them before loading, and you’ll save up to 10 gallons a load.

You should run only full loads. If you generally have small loads to wash, consider buying a double-drawer model. The drawers, which use less than 2 gallons of water each, work independently, saving water, energy and detergent.

Choose the Dishwasher Over Hand Washing. It may seem counterintuitive, but it turns out washing dishes by hand uses a lot more water than running the dishwasher, even more so if you have a water-conserving model. The EPA estimates an efficient dishwasher uses half as much water, saving close to 5,000 gallons each year.

Buy a high-efficiency washer. The average family washes about 300 loads of laundry each year. Clothes washing accounts for more than 20 percent of residential indoor water use.

As a rule, front-loading machines use less water than top-loading machines.To save the most water, look for an Energy Star–certified machine. These machines use about 40 percent less water than regular washers. Clothing is flipped and spun through streams of water and repeated high-pressure sprayings.

Use Clothes Washer Only for Full Loads. With clothes washers, avoid the permanent press cycle, which uses an added 5 gallons (20 liters) for the extra rinse. For partial loads, adjust water levels to match the size of the load.

Go with low-flow. Toilets, for example, account for nearly 30 percent of an average home’s indoor water consumption. Older toilets use as much as 6 gallons per flush. But the newer, dual flush toilets, use just over one-sixth of water per flush.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

For these Anniversary and concert programs a large wooden platform was erected extending the full width of the church auditorium and immediately in front of the choir seats. At the Sunday service all members of the School were seated in the choir loft or on this platform, and sometimes in addition, a small orchestra. At the Christmas party in 1911 a new electric lantern was tried out, (operated by Mr. Thos. Harrison) and found to be “first class.” It was put to use in the school the following January.

Sometime in the 1930’s Anniversary services gave way to White Gift services. These in more recent years have been marked by appropriate pageantry depicting the visit to the Christ Child in the Manger by the Shepherds and the Wise Men. For a while the Christmas concerts continued but for some years these have given way to parties for the small children and teenagers. The emphasis seems to have switched from a program performed by the children for the enjoyment of their parents ad friends to an entertainment for the scholars.

The Sunday School picnic has always been an important event in the yearly calendar. Dr. Watson, in the story of his father’s long association with this church, mentions the Sunday School picnic, usually held in “Holley’s Woods” near the Humber. Another author recalls many picnics held at Centre Island when special street cars and the ferry ride across Toronto Bay contributed not a little to the overall enjoyment of the day. 0f course, the traditional races and athletic events, not to mention the loaded lunch and supper tables, added their part. Other locations for the picnic have included Pelmo Park on “The Fifth” (now Jane Street), and High Park; and at least once, during World War II, Cruikshank Park on the Humber, just south of Church Street. More recently, picnics have been held at one of the Toronto Islands and Boyd Conservation Park north of Woodbridge, with the emphasis having shifted to congregational participation, and held on Saturdays rather than midweek. Called by whatever name, they have always been attended largely by the scholars, their teachers and parents, and have provided happy memories of carefree days for all who have some few years to jump back over to recall the time of their youth.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the story of “Pete.”

About being depressed he’d say, “You don’t even bother applying for a lot of things, because you just know it’s not worth the trouble. People are not going to give you a chance. As his friend said “The hospital has labelled me as narcotics seeking. It’s on file there, so I don’t bother going there anymore. They won’t even give me a pain killer because they take one look in your eyes and say ‘Oh, you’re a druggie!’” It’s hard to get a doctor when you’re a drunk. I slashed my wrists in the emergency room. They sewed me up, threw me out on the sidewalk and told me never to come back, even if I was dying.

But amazingly, in time, Pete’s spirits picked up. He went regularly to the same drop-in centre and gradually found friends and became known to the staff. The Housing Worker found him another room to live in and helped him with applications for financial assistance. The Harm Reduction worker made sure he had clean needles if he was injecting drugs and talked to him about the consequences of his drinking, offering rehabilitation if he chose. The manager gave Pete a chance to keep busy cooking and dishwashing. He found clothes in the drop-in’s clothing room and developed a dapper style of dressing that suited him. His French-Canadian accent gave him a charm he used on the ladies.

There was a year or two of ups and downs, unemployment and daily work, sobriety and drunkenness and depressing pain from his injuries. When he felt on top of the world, he was ready to create a new business plan for his community. That was why he was studying the rundown house. Dreaming of a future for it.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

May 20, 2021

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Thanks to Donna Latimer for finding this trove of trilliums.

The sudden appearance of summer-like weather reminds us that shared summer services are not far off. The year, our time together with friends from Weston Presbyterian Church begins with six Sundays “at” Central (June 20 to July 25) and ends with six Sundays at WPC (August 1 to September 5). All services begin at 10 am. Central’s summer services will follow the now familiar format, with an online service and Zoom worship (with the addition of WPC) at 10 am. There is a slight chance of in-person worship, so we will keep you posted.

Many thanks to Mary Louise and the Outreach Committee for leading worship on Sunday. It is inspiring to learn what a small group can achieve for the sake of the planet and the greater good.

Speaking of the Outreach Service, Dana sent Mary Louise some Humber memories after the service, and gave me permission to share them:

I enjoyed your message in the church service this morning on the Humber River and how it became a designated Canadian Heritage River.  I assume the Humber River that flows behind our family farm on Highway 27 just south of Nobleton, starts around Highway 9 and continues south past Kleinburg, and joins up with another tributary of the river just north of Woodbridge. I have many memories of the Humber River.  As a child growing up on our family farm, my two brothers and I, plus many other children in the area, swam in the river at the back of our farm.  We were quite young then, the water wasn’t very deep so our parents never seemed to worry about us. My brothers and I are really fortunate to still have the farm – its been in the family for over one hundred years.  Thanks again for your wonderful message which brings back many great memories.

Save the date! The Church School picnic has gone virtual! We’re planning a Zoom picnic on Sunday, June 13 at 11.30 am. There will be games, and whatever picnic food you wish to eat. More details to follow.

The Christian Education/Picnic Planning Committee will meet on Sunday, May 30 at 12.30 pm (by Zoom). 

In March we learned the sad news of the passing of Barry O’Brien, a former member of Central. His obituary appeared in the Guelph Mercury this week, and can be read here. We remember the family in our prayers.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (May 23) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 104: “There go the ships, and Leviathan that you formed to sport in it.”

Acts 2.1-8, 12-21 “And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Lilac’s from Liz Rodgerson!

Focus on Water

Barbara Bisgrove shares more material on water, a recent focus for the Outreach Committee.

The earth’s ecosystem neither adds nor takes away water. The total remains the same. But problems arise when water moves around and changes temperatures. Some regions of the earth are becoming arid whereas others are experiencing ever more flooding. Due to water scarcity, some 24 to 700 million people will be displaced from arid and semi-arid regions of the world.

Humans play a large role in the disruption of natural water distribution by building too many dams, by large factories polluting freshwater sources, by the building of ever more paved roads whose surfaces prevent rain being absorbed, by drilling disrupting bedrock and sea water mixing with fresh water, and by privatization of bottled water monopolizing the resource that should be available to people living at its source.

As our population grows the demand for water increases, as does the demand for food. Agriculture accounts for over two-thirds of the world’s water consumption. Three in ten people on earth currently do not have access to safe and clean water. There are over 840 million people without access to a basic water source while 263 million people travel over 30 minutes to access what is often unclean water. One and a half million people die every year from waterborne diseases.

Much of the world’s water supply is largely disproportionate. The average Canadian family uses about 460 litres of water per day while the average African family uses 18 litres per day. If the entire volume of freshwater were to be distributed evenly among all the earth’s inhabitants, each person would receive 13,700 litres of water, each day.

“Anything else you’re interested in is not going to happen if you can’t breathe the air and drink the water. Don’t sit this one out. Do something. You are by accident of fate alive at an absolutely critical moment in the history of our planet.” – Carl Sagan

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

Classes for the children have probably been held since the first church was erected and possibly prior thereto. Mr. James Lever served as Superintendent for about 40 years and was followed by Mr. William Watson for a period of a little better than 20 years. Succeeding superintendents do not appear to have held this important office for nearly such lengthy periods. We do not have a complete chronological list of all who have served but a large number of them are shown in the addends. Others who gave freely of their time and energy as teachers and officers down through a century and a half must run into a total of hundreds and we wish it were possible to give them individual recognition. Those who read this will no doubt recall many and give silent tribute to their faithfulness.

For some years starting at least early in the 1900’s the highlight of the Sunday School year was an Anniversary Sunday held early in December followed by a supper for the scholars one evening during the following week. Weeks of preparation were spent on special music for the Sunday services, both morning and evening. On the evening concert at which individual children took part and almost every class contributed a drill, skit, tableau or musical offering of some kind. Prizes were handed out to those who had attended Sunday classes regularly or learned a significant number of Bible verses. Of course, Santa Claus (often in the person of Mr. Albert Scythes) made a welcome visit and dispensed candy and fruit to all of the young ones.

Another look at the Klamer herbery.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the story of “Pete.”

He was such an active man that resting at home was difficult – lonely and boring. To cope he started drinking alcohol. The cocktail of opiates for pain, lack of sleep and alcohol, was addictive. He had failed to fasten his safety harness, leaving him with no entitlement to the compensation. He vented his rage in violent outbursts toward his family, and ultimately his angry behaviour lost him the community respect.

After six weeks of chaos, he packed a few things, took what money he felt was due to him, and left on a freight plane for Trois-Rivières. There he stayed at the YMCA while exploring the cheapest options to get himself to Toronto – as far away from his current life as he could manage. His English was limited to one school year and he made many mistakes at the beginning. Becoming increasingly discouraged as time went on, Pete found comfort in the taverns and bars. When his pain killers ran out it was easy to find more for sale on the streets. Finding work was much harder, especially without a phone to call people or receive return calls. Even having appropriate clothes for the seasons or the job is an issue for low-income people. Cheap jackets and no socks, gloves or underwear are not enough work outside in the winter He became a day labourer, to be picked up at a bus stop by construction crews needing extras for menial jobs on the site.

Pete found places that offered free meals. He joined the line-ups, taking any handouts on offer. Nearly two million Ontarians live in poverty. Without government investment in a strong workforce, equal pay for equal work, rent relief and so on, life for the poor is not improving. It was expensive to travel around Toronto on the buses or subway, and the physical labour took its toll. Sometimes, after drinking late into the night, Pete found it easier to stay in bed than look for work. Without the support and security of his home or a regular job, he found it difficult to fight off depression. No one seemed to care and dwindling funds brought their own anxiety.

Finally, Pete was evicted from his room for not paying the rent, and now he joined line-ups, not just for food, but for a shelter bed, a shower and the use of a free washer and dryer for his laundry. Some days he felt like crying when a person ahead in the line took the last sandwich or dregs of coffee from the communal urn. Life no longer felt fair, and the sun never seemed to shine. With his head down looking in curbs for dropped change and cigarettes, he failed to notice the sky. He felt anonymous within the much larger numbers of people than he had ever seen at home in Quebec.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Cathy Leask sent along a picture of a wee garden imp.

May 13, 2021

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Thanks to Zach DeConinck for sharing this photo, a perfect introduction to our Outreach Service on the themes of heritage and conservation on the Humber.

This week! The Outreach Committee will lead worship (Sunday, May 16 at 11 am, by Zoom). Our guest speaker will be our very own Mary Louise Ashbourne, who will speak about conservation and heritage, with special attention to the Humber. 

Save the date! The Church School picnic has gone virtual! We’re planning a Zoom picnic on Sunday, June 13. More details to follow.

Your Church Council Executive will meet this Sunday (May 16) at 12.30 pm by Zoom.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (May 16) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 1: “He is like a tree planted by streams of water that yields its fruit in its season, and its leaf does not wither.”

Job 12.7-13: “But ask the beasts, and they will teach you; the birds of the heavens, and they will tell you.

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Preparing for Sunday

Some background information, prepared by Barbara Bisgrove, with the title “Canada is Home to One-fifth of the World’s Fresh Water.”

While Canadians have the world’s third largest freshwater reserves, we can no longer be complacent about its safety. As global temperatures continue to rise, our glaciers and ice cover melt, river flows are unpredictable, and algae contaminates lake water. Scientists suggest all this is speeding up as shown by more frequent damage from floods, droughts and wildfires.

In recent decades, the quality of drinking water supplies in rural and Indigenous communities has degraded, leading to more than 100 drinking water advisories for reserves as of 2015. These forcing some of the 2,300 separate First Nations reserves to boil water, pay for water delivery or haul it from a water filling station. Some advisories last longer than a year. Imagine your water infected with fecal matter, sewers backing up into bathtubs or only bathing once a week because of water shortages – that is if you have running water and indoor plumbing.

An advisory may include information about preparing food, drinks, or ice; dishwashing; and hygiene, such as brushing teeth and bathing. Boil water advisories usually include how to boil the water and “Use bottled or boiled water for drinking, and to prepare and cook food.” Even pets need boiled water.

Last year, more than 250 members of the Neskantaga First Nation were evacuated to Thunder Bay after an oily sheen was found on their reservoir. The discovery left the community, located in northern Ontario, without access to running water. Evacuations separate families and friends and disrupt lives. Neskantaga has been living under a boil-water advisory for 26 years. Excessive water boiling leads to mould that deteriorates housing, causing overcrowding. Overcrowding and lack of running water contribute to the contraction of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA), the main antibiotic-resistant infection that disproportionately affects Indigenous people.

The federal government planned to have all long-term drinking water advisories removed by March this year. It is accountable for designing, building, and maintaining the pipes that serve 72% of on-reserve households in Canada. Since 2015, it has spent $2 billion to improve access to safe, clean drinking water. As of March 2019, it has lifted 81 long-term drinking water advisories, leaving 59 advisories in place. System repair or upgrades were reported as the reason for an advisory being removed in well over 90% of cases. Alarmingly, the rate of new long-term advisories has not slowed down. There are currently 19 short-term drinking water advisories that will be upgraded to long-term ones if not addressed soon.

Successful communities have invested heavily in monitoring and cellphone technology. It can take weeks from contamination suspicion, water testing by a distant lab to the results being returned to communities for action to be taken. The government subsidizes the salaries of locally engaged operators but needs a skilled labor force available on reserve as well as drinking water systems that available operators can manage successfully.

Seventy-three percent of on-reserve water systems are listed as high or medium risk, meaning the community does not have the local resources to fix standard system problems. When the funding runs out so will the subsidies. Decades of underfunding by the government on other public services like road and sewage lines and the proximity of many reservations to mining facilities put water systems at increased risk of contamination. It seems to be a problem where solutions need to be coordinated with the various agencies involved and that will take time.

Barb Putnam shared this image of past members who had a lasting impact on Central. Front row: Charles and Nora Ferguson, Edna Dean, Gordon Bailey. Back row: Bill Dean, Betty Gail, Dr. Godfrey Gail.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

This congregation has contributed its full share of members who have served the community as members of Council, Reeves and Mayors, York County Wardens, members of the local Board of education, Red Cross Society, Service Clubs and many other organizations. While complete records of those who have held public office in Weston are published elsewhere (in “The History of Weston: by Cruickshank-Nason, for example) the following notes are of interest to this congregation as the individuals referred to were affiliated with this church.

When Weston became a village, the first council meeting on January 16th. 1882, included Wm. Tyrrell, Reeve, and Jacob Bull and David Rowntree as Councillors. Weston became a Town in 1915, and its first Mayor was Dr.W.J.Charlton who served for five successive years. During the next 46 years until Weston became part of the Borough of York, the following gentlemen served for varying periods of one to three years as Mayor: G.A. Sainsbury, A.L. Coulter, W.J. Pollett, S.J. Totten, F.W. Mertens, K.L., Thompson and J.L. Holley.

Many active members of the congregation served the community in the field of education: Mr. A.L. Campbell, one time High School Principal and Public School Inspector; and Messrs. A. W. Pearson, E.,H.G. Worden and C.W. Christie, all occupied the post of Principal of Weston High School, later known as Weston Collegiate and Vocational Institute. The latter two named served for some years each as Secretary of the Official Board of the Church. Mr. J.R.H. (Archie) Morgan who occupied many important educational posts prior to his recent retirement (and received an honourary degree of Doctor of Law from the University of Toronto) is currently Chairman of our Christian Education Committee.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the story of “Pete”

“Pete,” as he now called himself, came from a French-Canadian community in northern Québec near the Labrador border. There he was known as “Pierre.” There were long, dark winters followed short summers, and larders, stocked by fishing and hunting. In those days, he was a young community leader, with a business plan for funding the construction of a community hall where people could gather – the older adults could smoke their pipes, click their knitting needles, or bend dried reeds into basket shapes. He wanted a place where young people could play ball hockey, hold dances, and host weekly Bingo games. He wanted to build a community centre that would bring people together. He could picture a place where young people could learn traditional skills and become self-sufficient. The elders could share their knowledge. They needed a community building to discuss policing matters, especially drunkenness and unemployment. There were increasing numbers of suicides happening and the caused need to be addresses by the community.

Oh, how excited he was about that business plan. He would go to the Council meetings and hold it up as he spoke quickly and passionately about what it could mean to build such a place and how the community would benefit. Those were good days. He worked in construction, had a supportive wife and two lively children. His brain overflowed with ideas. But it did not last. One wet day, he slipped and fell from a rooftop, landing with a painful crash into concrete blocks stacked and ready for the foundations. At that same moment, his hopes and dreams for the future crashed down around him. One doctor and a nursing assistant were the only professionals available to attend to medical emergencies. So, his scrapes, bruises, strained back muscles and dislocated rotary cuff were treated locally – not considered bad enough for transport south to better equipped medical facilities – and he was sent home to heal with a bottle of pain killers.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Joyce Klamer

May 6, 2021

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Photo by Donna Latimer

Let’s make a list! To mark Mother’s’ Day, let’s compile of list of names: mothers, step-mothers, maternal figures, surrogate mothers, you get the picture. Send me one or two names (just first names) and we’ll add them to the online worship page.

The Outreach Committee will meet tonight (May 6) at 7 pm by Zoom.

Speaking of Outreach, the next Outreach Service will take place on Sunday, May 16 at 11 am (by Zoom). Our guest speaker will be our very own Mary Louise Ashbourne, who will speak about conservation and heritage, with special attention to the mighty Humber. 

The latest Upper Room has arrived. If you would like a copy, give Terry a call at 416-417-1224.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (May 9) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 98: “O sing to the LORD a new song, for he has done marvelous things.

John 15.9-17: “I have said these things to you so that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be complete.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Another great photo from the Weston Historical Society. It was taken in 1990.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

Many others have of course given generously of time, treasure and talents but it is not possible to name them all, nor would it be fair to attempt to do so as obviously overlooked. There would appear to be very little chance of any group claiming a longer period of continuous service in the church than the Trustees, starting with the original seven named in the deed previously referred to. There are now 12 men on this Board, appointed for life as long as they retain membership in this congregation. While ladies have been elected as Elders and Stewards for some few years, none have been chosen to serve as Trustees to date. Most trustees are either Elders or Stewards, but not necessarily so.

Apart from their official duties on various boards and committees, and their participation in Sunday School, The Choir, and other activities, the men of the church have at different times formed other groups. These have operated as a Sunday study group or as a monthly social club, under such names as “The Brotherhood,” “The Men’s Club” etc. but there has been no substantial continuity to them through the years.

As previously noted, there are now Lady Elders and Lady Stewards. The former have a “Parish” wherein they have the spiritual oversight of members assigned to their care, and to whom they regularly deliver Communion Tokens. History was made at the Easter communion service in 1969, when for the first tie at Central four Lady Elders assisted in the serving of the Bread and the Wine. They were Mrs. Edna Dean, Miss Eveline McCort, Mrs. Elsie Powell and Mrs. Dorothy Sutton.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares the story of “Pete”

He stood on the sidewalk, outside the rundown house. He was a small man, shorter than average. His hair was starting to go grey, and he had a bald spot. He had on a well-worn black leather jacket, neatly ironed blue jeans, and on his feet were cleanly scrubbed running shoes. He was standing quite still as if sizing up the house. 

The house was a typical 1950’s Ontario structure with a veranda across the front, a pointed roof over the door, a street-facing bay window to the left, and two more on the second floor. There was a “For Sale” sign on the grass.  Besides the house ran several railway tracks carrying high-speed passenger trains to the city’s airport, commuter trains between the office blocks and suburban homes, and monotonously long freight trains heading across the country. The crossing gates clanged down when a train crossed the road, and in rush hour there was a constant stream of commuters hurrying past the spot where he stood outside the house. 

With a takeaway coffee cup in one hand and a folder under the other arm, he moved across the road to sit on the planks of wood surrounding one of the parking lot trees. Putting down his coffee cup, he searched for his cigarettes, pulled one out of the packet, tapped it and lit it with his lighter. He breathed in, sucking smoke into his lungs, and holding it there before releasing it and letting it float away on the small breeze. He had nowhere to go and plenty of time for his dreams.

There was a rumble of passing freight cars with their soothing and steady click, contrasted with the sharp and plaintive cries of seagulls circling in the grey sky above. He raised his head to watch them for a moment as if there was something familiar about them. Then he went back to the folder in hand. It contained a carefully typed business plan. 

Worth a Look

You don’t need to have a Twitter account to browse Vaccine Hunters Canada, an active group that are tracking available vaccines by location, age, and postal code!

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Cathy Leask

April 29, 2021

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Photo by Judith Hayes

Pastoral Relations Update: This is less an update and more a map of the journey ahead. Kathy Steiner is the point-person for this first stage of the transition, so she is the person to speak to with questions or concerns. In brief, Central will work with the regional council to appoint a supply minister starting September 1. This person will provide worship and pastoral care, and administrative help to allow the congregation to focus on the next phase of the search. A congregational profile will be created, and shared on the denominational matching site. Again, Shining Waters Regional Council will supply the support needed to ease this transition. Based on typical timelines, there may be a new minister in place as early as the summer of 2022.

The latest Upper Room has arrived. If you would like a copy, give Terry a call at 416-417-1224.

The Outreach Committee will meet (by Zoom) on Thursday, May 6 at 7 pm.

Speaking of Outreach, the next Outreach Service will take place on Sunday, May 16 at 11 am (by Zoom). Our guest speaker will be our very own Mary Louise Ashbourne, who will speak about conservation and heritage, with special attention to the mighty Humber.

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

We are pleased to report that a generous donation was received from the Jack Thomas Fund at the Toronto Foundation. A letter expressing our gratitude has been sent.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 22: “All the ends of the earth shall remember and turn to the LORD.

John 15.1-8: “You have already been cleansed by the word that I have spoken to you.

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

May be an image of car and road
Westminster United Church, February 1953 (Weston Historical Society)

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

Available records do not give much detail with respect to the composition of the bodies responsible for the spiritual and financial needs in the early years. One supposes they conformed to Methodist tradition and practice through the years preceding Union. There was a “Quarterly Official Board” whose minutes, kept regularly enough, were so brief as to convey little information of what was going on. For example, one can’t find any record in these minutes of adoption of the new name when the church entered Union and became “Central United,” although the minutes of a meeting held on September 21st, 1925, were headed “First Quarterly Board Meeting of the Central United Church.” On April 28th, 1926, the congregation selected 15 Elders and 15 Stewards to compose a “ Board” as laid down by the United Church. In February of 1928 the number of each group was increased to 21 for three year terms. In more recent years the membership of the Session has been increased in two stages to the present number of 52, and the Committee of Stewards now numbers 35.

Members of the Session (Elders) and the Committee of Stewards, together with representatives of the U.C.W. and others, form the Official Board which meets regularly to dispose of such business as cannot properly be handled by either the Session or the Stewards alone. The Official Board also acts on behalf of the congregation in matters which may not be of sufficient importance to warrant calling a special meeting of the congregation. Annual meetings of all members and adherents of the church are held early in each year to receive and review reports of the previous year’s work of the various organizations and to elect new representatives to various bodies as may be necessary.

On January 15th., 1930, Dr. W. Howard Charlton was appointed Secretary of the Official Board to succeed his father, Dr. W. J. Charlton. In succession these two men served their church for over fifty years in the offices of Recording Steward while Methodist and Secretary of the Board after Union. The Chancel window was donated by the Charlton family in 1938 in memory of their father.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara continues to describe her involvement in the drop-in:

Volunteering at the drop-in was almost like an unpaid job. With other Board members, I took on responsibilities for building a new organization – fundraising, policy and manual writing, supervising, etc. The organization became incorporated. Elected to the Board of Directors, I became the secretary. For 11 years, I led a volunteer team planning and cooking the Tuesday night community meals developing a cookbook for 80 portions in the process. I designed information posters, handouts and so on – an aspect of the work I most enjoyed.

The drop-in has grown to a six-day-a-week agency offering housing, harm reduction, laundry facilities, a clothing room, computers, library and at our maximum had 12 staff on the books. A second site was added with a commercial kitchen used by entrepreneurs and community groups and a storefront selling fresh fruit and vegetables in the food desert of Mount Dennis.

When I became less physically able, I turned my hand to writing short weekly articles for the church “Blast” and creating a monthly newsletter for drop-in participants. Writing involved enjoyable research and exploring programs throughout the world. My aim was understanding the effects of poverty and homelessness. In volunteering I always felt I received more than I ever gave. I have learned so much, found new friends and became known in my community. I know volunteer work is valuable to my mental health, especially after retiring. I found many ways to use my “lived experience skills” and keep mentally stimulated. I have a purpose for my day.

I began writing these stories based on what I heard and learned, to keep alive and share the memories of people I met and the fun I had. Peoples’ stories opened my heart and allowed me to recognize any one of those people could have been me with a little bad luck or loss of wellbeing.

I admire people who have used entrepreneurship and courage to survive within difficult circumstances. As Christians I believe we should be extending the hand of Jesus to the needy in our community. I can no longer cook or volunteer in a physical way, but my fingers still type, and my mind is still active, so I want to share these experiences with others.

Worth a Look

Thanks to Judith, for suggesting this photo series of animals who would rather be photographers.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Cathy Leask

April 22, 2021

Astronaut William Anders took this photo on December 24, 1968, during the Apollo 8 mission. Nature photographer Galen Rowell declared it “the most influential environmental photograph ever taken.”

Happy Earth Day! Read the press release that describes Earth Day activities in Toronto, including a message from the Mayor John Tory, details of a virtual celebration (with the Women4Climate Mentorship Programme) and a look at PollinateTO Community Grant recipients.

The latest Upper Room has arrived. If you would like a copy, give Terry a call at 416-417-1224.

The Outreach Committee will meet (by Zoom) on Thursday, May 6 at 7 pm.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (April 18) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 23: “Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no evil; for you are with me.”

John 10.11-18: “I am the good shepherd.

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

No photo description available.
A rare stereoscopic postcard from the Weston Historical Society.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

We were honoured for some years in having in our congregation the late Rev. Olivia Lindsay, a retired missionary of the church in Japan, and at the time one of the few ordained women in the United Church. She was an Honourary Elder. Another beloved worshipper with us when his official duties permitted his spending the weekend in Weston was the late Rev. Dr. D. I. Forsyth, for many years Secretary of the United Church Board of Christian Education. He was also an Honourary Elder and after his passing in 1967, a memorial in the form of a beautiful bound copy of the Revised Standard Version of the Bible was placed in the Pulpit. At this point it might be mentioned that previous Pulpit Bibles (King James Version) were donated by Mrs. Andrew Kaake in 1887 to mark the opening of the new church in that year, and by Dr. and Mrs. E. F. Burton in 1938 on the re-opening of the church after alterations at that time.

Many other ministers, retired from active service, made their church home with us. Some names come to mind: the Revs. John Morgan, W. Rodwell, R. H. Rodgers, George Kitching, D. Williams, W. N. Chantler and A. Thomson. If there were others whose names escape us, we apologize to their families and friends.

In June, 1963, Central Church shared with its Minister, the Rev. R. E. Spencer, the honour of his election as Chairman of Toronto West Presbytery. The occasion was marked by the presentation of a new Emmanuel College Hood, the Session having heard through the grapevine that the one in service for over 25 years was in need of replacement. We have no record of a Central Minister having been elected to an administrative office such as head of Presbytery or Conference prior to that time. A year later Mr. Spencer was elected as Commissioner to General Council which met in St. John’s, Newfoundland, in September. In 1966, Dr. Godfrey Gale was chosen as a lay delegate to General Council which met that year in Waterloo, Ont. In 1968, Mr. Clifford Mertens was elected as a delegate from Toronto Conference to General Council Meeting in Kingston, Ont. This Spring (1970) the Rev. Paul. B. Field was chosen to be a Commissioner to General Council to meet in Niagara Falls, Ont. Concurrently with the meeting of the Synod of the Anglican Church. It is a signal honour for laymen to be named Commissioners to General Council, and it must be something of a record for one church of medium size such as Central to be officially represented at the Council four times in succession.

In spite of the fact that the majority of our pastors have come to us in middle age or later, there is no record of one having passed on to higher service while minister to this congregation. In 1938 we shared with our Westminster friends their grief in the passing of the Rev. G. Ernest Forbes who had been their minister for 14 years and a one-time Chairman of Toronto West Presbytery.

One of our long time active and fervent laymen, Mr. John Lennox, achieved the ripe old age of 103 before passing on in 1937. The Board had recognized his birthday the previous year with a sheaf of roses.

While there were undoubtedly many other occasions on which the congregation paid special tribute to its ministers, one more comes to mind. During the pastorate of the Rev. Harry Pawson, he and Mrs. Pawson celebrated their 25th Wedding Anniversary, and a social gathering with an appropriate presentation marked the event.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara describes how her involvement in the drop-in began:

In 1993, I heard volunteers were needed at Central United Church to help with a weekly evening meal offered to the community. Joining the group as a volunteer dishwasher and meeting the people who come into the church lower hall began a growth journey for me. Over the years I have developed a respect and love for many of these people and have cared deeply about their setbacks and successes.

The numbers of diners – and eventually of dishes to be washed – increased until we were preparing for 80 each week. The meals evolved from sandwiches to a full-cooked meal. In 1999, a young man named Seth, contacted the church. He knew we had a population of low-income, marginalized people with more needs than just hunger, and offered to open a satellite of his agency on our premises.

As Seth was a trained drop-in worker from the UK, he told us – people from the church – how to apply to the City of Toronto for funding. Soon I wrote the first of many funding applications. The first to hire Seth and build a lower floor kitchen, a wheelchair ramp and buy equipment to serve food. Seth brought in staff from Public Health and The Works – a harm reduction agency that did needle exchange and provided safe crack use kits for drug users and condoms for sex workers.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

April 15, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png
Photo by Carmen Palmer

Many thanks for the well-wishes and kind words this week. We are only beginning to learn the implications of retirement and moving, and we feel blessed by the encouragement and support.

The Church Council Executive will meet this Sunday (by Zoom) at 12.30 pm.

Sell Your Talent, Final Update: We are delighted to report over $2,200 in sales from Sell Your Talent. Thanks to our talented people, and thanks to everyone who made a purchase, or helped someone else make a purchase.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (April 18) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 4: “Answer me when I call, O God of my right! You gave me room when I was in distress. Be gracious to me, and hear my prayer.”

Luke 24.36b-48: “Then he opened their minds to understand the scriptures.

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

No photo description available.
Photo of the former Westminster United Church (built 1952-53) from the Weston Historical Society.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

To comment on or make comparisons of any of the men who have guided the destinies of this congregation for the past half century would be unfair to those not specifically named, and might indeed only reflect personal views not shared by others who have been closely associated with our pastors during this period. References to particular individuals have therefore been limited to their association with some special event mentioned in this historical outline. It may be noted in passing and without attempting to make any point of its significance, that since Union and up until 1968, all of our ministers have come to us from Methodist tradition and training, with but one exception. That man occasionally challenged his listeners to attempt to decide on the basis of the doctrinal content of his sermons which denomination he belonged to before Union. Very few knew at the time that it was Congregationalist.

For some years we had the assistance of theological students from Emmanuel College during the winter months in Christian Education and midweek work. These men were later ordained and went on to serve on mission fields and in regular pastorates. The following list is believed to be complete: Ronald McPhee (1955); David Staples (1955-57); J. Duffy (1957-58); L. Heffelfinger (1958-59); G. Craig (1959-60). We also had the services of the Rev. J. W. Gordon as a pastoral assistant for a brief period, including the year 1953.

Here we would like to record the long and faithful service of the Rev. Enos W. Hart who came to this congregation as Pastoral Assistant, first to Mr. Spencer in 1961, and continuing with Mr. Field from 1968 to 1970. Both he and Mrs. Hart contributed greatly to the happy fellowship of this congregation. Mr. Hart was always a very welcome visitor at all homes, but more particularly so with the elderly, the sick and the shut-ins.

He also conducted worship services regularly for the patients at Weston Sanitarium, preached from our pulpit on many occasions and participated in Communion and other special services. He was particularly helpful during Mr. Spencer’s busy term as Chairman of Toronto West Presbytery (1963-64) and also during his illness early in 1968. A farewell reception was held for Mr. and Mrs. Hart on Sunday, May 24th, 1970.

An Element of Truth

Barbara Bisgrove has graciously allowed us to share excepts of her publication “An Element of Truth: Stories Based on What Was Heard and Learned at the Drop-in.” In this section, Barbara shares her early years as a volunteer in the UK:

In 2011, researchers at Johns Hopkins University estimated that almost one billion people in the world volunteer their time every year. And we do it for many reasons – to keep busy, to give back, a sense of duty, a court requirement, an opportunity to learn a language or skill, and to feel blessed for being given the opportunity. Today, in my eighties, I am thrilled to be given the title of “Senior with Lived Experience,” and am volunteering by advising various groups on seniors’ needs, especially those who want to remain living in their own homes.

I started my volunteering in high school – it was baby sitting and dog walking before that. Then, through an orphanage – originally a foundling hospital established in 1739 by Thomas Coram, who was appalled by the abandoned children he saw on the streets – I was assigned a tiny four-year old boy previously adopted from the hospital, and now returned, neglected and mute. Since he was older than the other children, I became his caregiver and was to observe and report on his behaviours. I took him for walks, at times in a large baby carriage with two babies facing me and two with their backs to me. Passersby made cheeky remarks since the children were a multicultural mix!

Another eye-opening job was meeting with a group of Quakers on weekends to clean up apartments in Shoreditch, a low-income area of London. There I found four units on each level sharing a cold-water sink and toilets. Our job was to whitewash the walls to remove some of the grime. These experiences heightened my interest in observing lives of others, seeing them for themselves, while getting involved in finding solutions where needed. It led me to a lifetime of seeking opportunities to better lives, joining workplace and community groups, attending workshops and reading biographies.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

April 8, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png

Sell Your Talent, the Result: We are pleased to report that 46 orders were processed, over 220 products were purchased, with total sales of $1680. The site is now closed. Thank you to our talented people and everyone who placed an order! Since the lockdown is now in effect, we are going to do a form of curbside pick-up. Please arrive between 12 and 1 pm on Saturday (east doors of the church on King Street) and someone will greet you outside and get your items for you. Please have cash or a cheque for the correct amount. Thank you for helping us keep everyone safe.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (April 11) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 133: “How very good and pleasant it is when kindred live together in unity!”

John 20.19-31: “Do not doubt but believe.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

No photo description available.
Another amazing image for the Weston Historical Society. This shows the front of Central prior to the 1938 renovation. Note the double aisle and the centre pulpit, very Methodist.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

Some of the early ministers to this congregation later became very well known for their public services apart from their spiritual ministry. Among these was the Rev. Egerton Ryerson (son of an Anglican), one of our earliest (1825) and whose brothers also served on our circuit. Ryerson later became the founder of the Christian Guardian and the father of the Ontario Public School System. The Rev. George Playter (1842) became a noted historian; and R. P. Bowles who was ordained after his ministry on the circuit, subsequently became Chancellor of Victoria University.

The congregation has contributed some of its members to the preaching of the Gospel; sons of the first two Sunday School Superintendents, James Lever ad William Watson, both became ministers of the Methodist Church though they apparently did not serve the Weston congregation. In November, 1925, the Official Board recommended that Percy I. Davidge be given his standing as a probationer, having travelled two years on a mission. He was later ordained by the United Church of Canada. During his college years he served for a short time as student pastor of Harding Ave. Mission, just east of Weston. This later became Trethewey United Church. Mr. Davidge passed away in 1969.

A few year later this congregation sponsored Arthur Carrington who passed away in 1933 just prior to his expected ordination. It fell to the lot of a man who later became a minister here (Mr. Spencer) to deliver the funeral sermon in this church. More recently Central Church supported Robert McPhee in his studies toward obtaining a theological degree and he was ordained by the United Church in 1964.

This church has had close personal interest in overseas missionary work through Miss Dorothy Pearson, daughter of Mr. A. W. Pearson one time Principal of Weston High School and an active member of the church with a keen interest in its missionary work. After two periods of furlough and recuperation from poor health, Miss Pearson is once again in India working for the Government in the field of education.

Minute for Mission

Thank You for Your Support during the COVID-19 Crisis!

In 2020, your Mission & Service gifts: helped people at home and abroad struggling to put food on the table for their families; ensured those who are most vulnerable receive medical care and personal protective equipment; supported those who struggle with addiction and mental health issues to access counselling services; created networks of support for young people whose rhythms and relationships are disrupted because of the virus; provided emotional and spiritual care for those in hospital and their families as well as medical staff.

These are just some of the concrete ways your reliable support through Mission & Service has already made a huge difference during this crisis. Your ongoing support will continue to go directly to those who are most impacted by the pandemic at home and around the world.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544