February 18, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png
“AIC: Marc Chagall Stained Glass” by Taaalia is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 Much of the artwork in our study this evening is by Marc Chagall

Tonight! Join our study tonight (Thursday, February 18) at 7 pm as we begin a four-part introduction to scripture (by Zoom). We will explore major themes, keys to understanding, and some well-loved passages. Each session will be approximately an hour. A Zoom invitation will be sent this afternoon. Please note: this is an introductory study, and no prior knowledge is needed.

The Church Council will meet on Sunday, March 14 at 12.30 pm (by Zoom), one week before the annual meeting.  Every once who belongs to a committee is a member of the Church Council. It’s generally a short meeting, with time for reviewing reports and passing a draft budget. Speaking of reports, a reminder to those responsible for drafting a report, please forward it to Taye as soon as possible.

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (February 21) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the now traditional 8 am service by email. However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

Here at the Blast, we love seasonal pictures. Do you have something to share?

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Photo by Donna Latimer

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday. The email will include a link to the 11 am service by Zoom.

Readings this week:

Psalm 25: “Make me to know your ways, O LORD; teach me your paths.”

Mark 1.9-15: “He was in the wilderness forty days, tempted by Satan; and he was with the wild beasts; and the angels waited on him.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

More Announcements

KAIROS presents “Canada, the Churches, and Bill C-15” on Thursday, February 18 at 7 pm. This event is sponsored by Faith in the Declaration: A coalition of faith houses and organizations in support of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples legislation. KAIROS is part of the Faith in the Declaration coalition and invites you to this conversation on why the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) legislation is important to Canadian churches. A panel of experts will describe Bill C-15, the legislation the government of Canada is introducing to implement UNDRIP, and explore the support and opposition to the Bill. Panelists include Panel Moderator: Archbishop Mark MacDonald, Chief Wilton (Willie) Littlechild, Professor Sheryl Lightfoot, and Ellen Gabriel. The event will be in English with simultaneous French translation. Register for the event here.

Read the WAES food bank annual report here. It describes the impact WAES has made during the last few months, and says some kind things about Central.

Plan ahead! The administrative life of Central continues to unfold, with meetings planned and corresponding deadlines set. To that end, we can announce the Annual Meeting (by Zoom) scheduled for Sunday, March 21 at noon. Taye will be preparing the annual report, and needs individual reports by February 21. Sooner is better, of course, something this author will try to take to heart. 

Pearen Memorial United Church in 1955, photo by James V. Salman. Pearen Memorial began as Mount Dennis Methodist, adopting the name Pearen in 1925. In 1960, Pearen amalgamated with Chalmers United to become Mount Dennis United Church (Toronto Public Library photo, public domain)

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

In 1911 some extensive alterations were made. An April 1961 issue of the “Weston Times & Guide” in a column relating events of interest fifty years previously, quotes from the April 27th, 1911 issue: “The Methodist Church was reopened on Sunday, April 23rd. The financial statement showed that the improvements to the church cost $4,000.00. One half of this amount was asked for and a very liberal response was given to the appeal. The Trustees expect to see the full amount asked for in hand by next Sunday evening.” The amount referred to no doubt included the cost of the new organ. Perhaps the outbreak of the first World War in 1914 and its continuance for four years contributed to the delay in completing clearance of the indebtedness, or possibly later deficits were experienced as minutes of the Official Board meeting in November, 1922, make reference to a debt of $2,850.00, and plans to wipe it out were discussed.

Late in the 1920’s there was considerable agitation on the part of Sunday School workers ad others for improved and larger accommodation. During the pastorate of the Rev. E. Harold Toye (1929-1931) elaborate plans were prepared for a completely new church building to replace the 1887 structure. The proposed edifice was to face on Main Street and be of Gothic architecture. At this time overtures were made to Westminster United suggesting amalgamation. Sympathetic consideration was given to the proposal by our sister congregation then worshipping in a building on the west side of Main Street, below Lawrence Ave., which had been designed and erected as a Sunday School, but they decided against the proposed union. While there was considerable enthusiasm for the new church there also was some opposition. This may have contributed to the demise of the project but the main reason it was not proceeded with was undoubtedly the question of financing as the country was just entering what became the great depression of the 1930’s. Failure to proceed with the proposed building may also have contributed to the shortened pastorate of Mr. Toye.

In 1937, under the leadership of the Rev. Harry Pawson, plans were laid for extensive alterations which were proceeded with and completed the following year. The architects were Bruce, Brown & Bisley. The cornerstone, now in the south wing, and third in our history, was laid in August, 1938, by Dr. J. B. Tyrrell (son of the previously mentioned Squire Tyrrell). Re-opening services were held November 27th, when the Rev. G. W. Barker, President of Toronto Conference, spoke at the morning service, and the Very Rev. George Pidgeon, D.D. of Bloor St. United Church, in the evening. A concert was held the next night, featuring the Lyric Male Chorus of Toronto, assisted by local artists, and an address by W.J.Johnston of Eglinton United Church, and a musical program. Special services were continued for the next two Sundays, the speakers on December 4th being the Rev. J.E. Todd of St. Clair Ave., and the Rev. Simon Edwards of Parkdale; and the Rev. Harold Young of Avenue Road on December 11th. there was a Missionary rally on Wednesday, December 7th, with the Rev. Bruce Gray as the speaker. Special music by the choir under the direction of Mr. Clare Henley and guest soloists was provided for all of the special services.

Minute for Mission

The Diocese of Durgapur of Mission & Service partner the Church of North India has a vision: Transforming Communities, Changing Lives. Since 2011, the Diocese has been doing just that with the Anti Human Trafficking Program in North and South Dinajpur Districts.

Through the Diocese of Durgapur, the Church of North India organizes awareness sessions with community leaders, guardians, and youth who may be directly approached by traffickers. The training includes sharing stories from trafficking victims as well as making them aware of the laws intended to protect victims and prosecute traffickers. Through a growing network of community relationships, the Diocese works with local leaders and authorities to stop this abhorrent trade.

Your gifts to Mission & Service help save adults and children from being trafficked.

Worth a Look

Black History Month: Who were the Black Loyalists? This article gives some background and features a new coin minted to commemorate them.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

February 11, 2021

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Photo by Alice Moores-Rodgerson

Join our Lenten Study! On Thursday, February 18 (at 7 pm) we begin a four-part introduction to scripture (by Zoom). We will explore major themes, keys to understanding, and some well-loved passages. Each session will be approximately an hour. Email Michael for more information.

The Church Council Executive will meet on Sunday, February 14 at 12.30 pm. 

Zoom worship continues! Join us this Sunday (February 14) beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the traditional 8 am service by email (can you call something 10 months old traditional?). However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
 (once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to our Zoom hosts (Faith, Kathy, Joyce, and Kerri) as well as Jenny and Heather for making our weekly worship by Zoom possible.

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

Here at the Blast, we love seasonal pictures. Do you have something to share?

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

This bright-eyed lass is Norah, daughter of Emily and Brian. Congratulations! Also congrats to Barb and Bob on their first great-grandchild.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Psalm 50: “Out of Zion, the perfection of beauty, God shines forth.”

2 Kings 2.1-12: “As the LORD lives, and as you yourself live, I will not leave you.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

More Announcements

Read the WAES food bank annual report here. It describes the impact WAES has made during the last few months, and says some kind things about Central.

Plan ahead! The administrative life of Central continues to unfold, with meetings planned and corresponding deadlines set. To that end, we can announce the Annual Meeting (by Zoom) scheduled for Sunday, March 21 at noon. Taye will be preparing the annual report, and needs individual reports by February 21. Sooner is better, of course, something this author will try to take to heart. 

As we celebrate 200 years, we also celebrate the congregations that make us who we are. This picture shows Westminster Presbyterian (later United) under construction in 1911 (Toronto Reference Library photo, public domain)

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

A branch of this denomination, which came to Canada from England and not to be confused with the American Episcopal Church, was established in Weston about the mid 1830’s. We know nothing of its beginnings and can only assume that it may have been an offshoot of the Wesleyan Methodist Church here. A small frame building was erected on Church Street, and perhaps was the reason for so naming the street. Unfortunately, we have been unable to obtain any information pertaining to this congregation up until the time it joined with the older Methodist Church in 1884 when all branches of Methodism in Canada united. These included the Wesleyan Methodist, Methodist Episcopal, Primitive Methodist, New Connection and Free Methodist. Probably at that time the united congregation here became known as “Weston Methodist Church.”

Records of Missionary givings indicate some members of both churches prior to the union contributed to the annual collections of both groups, so that there appears to have been friendly relations between the two. Amicable relations must also have obtained between the M.E. Church and the “Weston Free Church” (Presbyterian). The Rev. J. N. MacDonald records in his “History of Westminister United Church, Weston”, one of the successor congregations to the Weston Presbyterian Church: “On October 4th, 1858, the Session agreed to ask for the use of Knox Church (Toronto) communion service, and that application be made to obtain the use of the ‘Episcopal Methodist Chapel’ for a Sabbath evening service in place of an afternoon service”. From this it would appear that the initial service of the Presbyterian folk were held in the M.E. building on Sunday afternoons until their church was erected just around the corner on Cross Street.

The report of the Committees on Church Property to the 3rd Session of the Toronto Conference of the newly formed Methodist Church in Canada, held in St. Paul’s Church, Brampton, from June 10th to 17th, 1886, contained a recommendation “That the Trustees of the church formerly situated in the village of Weston have permission to sell the same, proceeds to be applied toward the erection of a new church in the village of Weston.” The Trustees’ Financial Report (Weston Methodist Church) for 1886 includes the following single line entry, “Amount of Sale M.E. Church $445.50”. This, incidentally, appears to be the only reference which would confirm the fact of a merger between the two Methodist congregations in Weston, and this apparently took place in 1884. The M.E. Church building was purchased by the local Oddfellows Lodge on April 12th, 1866, and the following summer the single storey frame building was converted into a two storey brick building. This still stands on the original site on the north side of Church Street just east of Weston Road. The Oddfellows Hall became a meeting place of other fraternal organizations in Weston, including the Masonic Lodge which used the second storey until the erection of their new Temple on the west side of Weston Road just north of King Street in the 1920’s.

A small flush toilet, not provided in the original building, was added to this area sometime after the turn of the century. From this location also a short flight of steps provided an exit toward the cemetery and a long narrow stairway led up to the main floor. Here there was a doorway into the sanctuary and another exit on the east side of the building. An even narrower stairway continued up behind the choir loft permitting an orderly filing of the choristers to the seats at the opening of the service.

Minute for Mission

Our gifts for Mission & Service support theological education in seven theological schools across Canada. Emmanuel College in Toronto is one of them.

There is a certain energy when you enter Emmanuel College that is difficult to pinpoint. The energy could be from the history of students and faculty, many of whose pictures hang in the corridors, or it could be the energy of the current student body, a diverse interfaith group studying for ministry, teaching, or lifelong learning.

Like many United Church theological schools, Emmanuel is a place to explore and challenge long-held beliefs. The process for those who are studying for ministry has many paths to navigate, from interviews with regional councils to internships and meeting all the requirements of their courses. That is where the faculty come in, educators with a special pastoral side that is not found in other university settings. Theological colleges can become places that feel like home, and that is truly where the energy comes from—the feeling of care and respect between students and professors.

What a gift it is to support students and colleges like these! Thank you for your gifts that create a welcoming and caring environment where students can explore and take risks.

Worth a Look

Black History Month: Learn about historic black communities in Canada and some of the events that defined them.

Also Worth a Look

The City of Toronto Planning Department has launched the Mount Dennis Planning Framework Study, beginning with an interactive map to pinpoint community highlights, needs, and resources. Open the map, and you can comment or add, or simply see what your neighbours are thinking about. Visit the website here.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

February 4, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png
Photo by Donna Latimer

Zoom worship continues! Beginning this Sunday (February 7), worship will happen in real time on Zoom, beginning at 11 am. You will still receive the traditional 8 am service by email (can you call something 10 months old traditional?). However, you can now watch a live version of the same service on your computer or device, followed by a time of fellowship. Like this past Sunday, you will be greeted by a host as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and have the opportunity to remain on the call for “coffee time” after the service. 

Will all Zoom invitations, there is an option to join by telephone. Here are some instructions:

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #
(once in the meeting, press *6 to mute and unmute)

Thanks to Faith, Jenny, and Heather for making our Zoom communion possible. And thank you to everyone who remained on the call. I understand furry creatures stole the show.

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

Join our Lenten Study! On Thursday, February 18 (at 7 pm) we begin a four-part introduction to scripture (by Zoom). We will explore major themes, keys to understanding, and some well-loved passages. Each session will be approximately an hour. Email Michael for more information.

Read the WAES food bank annual report here. It describes the impact WAES has made during the last few months, and says some kind things about Central.

Here at the Blast, we love seasonal pictures. Do you have something to share?

The City of Toronto Planning Department has launched the Mount Dennis Planning Framework Study, beginning with an interactive map to pinpoint community highlights, needs, and resources. Open the map, and you can comment or add, or simply see what your neighbours are thinking about. Visit the website here.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Psalm 147: “The LORD takes pleasure in those who fear him, in those who hope in his steadfast love.”

Isaiah 40.21-31: “Have you not known? Have you not heard?”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Thanks to Barb Putnam for this screenshot of our service on Sunday.

More Announcements

Offering envelopes have arrived. If you wish to have them now, you can call Terry and we will arrange to have them dropped off. Or, you could wait until in-person worship resumes and pick them up then. Terry’s number of 416-417-1224.

Plan ahead! The administrative life of Central continues to unfold, with meetings planned and corresponding deadlines set. To that end, we can announce the Annual Meeting (by Zoom) scheduled for Sunday, March 21 at noon. Taye will be preparing the annual report, and needs individual reports by February 21. Sooner is better, of course, something this author will try to take to heart. 

The Church Council Executive will meet on Sunday, February 14 at 12.30 pm. 

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

No detail is available concerning the first church building erected, we believe, in 1821, except that it was of log construction and faced on, but well back from what was then known as “Albion Road,” subsequently called in turn “Weston Plank Road,” “Main Street,” and now “Weston Road.” In keeping with the deed of 1821, this church was probably connected with the American Episcopal Church.

In 1849, a larger building was erected, also facing on but closer to Weston Road. This was red brick and seated 220 people, with accommodation for the Sunday School in the basement. The corner stone for this building bore the inscription “Wesleyan Chapel A.D. 1849.” [see below] This stone, missing for some years, came back into our possession in 1961. It had been removed when the building was demolished in 1887 to make way for the third church, and put into the wall of a house on the farm of the Dennis family, long associated with this congregation, and located on the banks of the Humber River near Eglinton Avenue. It was subsequently placed in the west wall of the narthex of the present building, along with the stone bearing the date 1887 which is over the stairway leading to the gallery.

We have a fairly detailed description of the second chapel as contained in a sketch of the life of William Watson, Superintendent of the Sunday School from 1861 to 1883. This was written by his son, the Rev. William G. Watson in 1940 “for the archives of Central United Church, Weston.” Dr. Watson, at the time of his writing, was Professor of Hebrew at Pine Hill Divinity Hall, Halifax, N.S. He states that both his father and his grandfather, Christopher Watson, were buried in the Methodist Cemetery here.

Speaking of this brick building, Dr. Watson comments: “I well remember the ‘Wesleyan Chapel’ which was in use when I was a boy. It was a plain rectangular building with a basement where the Sunday School was held. It faced on Main Street. A grey stone with the ‘Wesleyan Chapel A. D. 1849’ was set into the brick immediately above the door. Steps went up the wall from each side of the door and immediately underneath steps went down into the basement. The basement was partially beneath the ground and in wet weather water often lay upon the floor. The church was plainly furnished but was comfortable and usually well filled with worshippers . The pulpit was high up on the Eastern wall, and approached by steps. In front of the pulpit and beneath it was the Communion Table surrounded by a railing. At the back of the church (the West end) the Choir sat on a slightly raised platform. There was a door on the south side of the pulpit, opening out on the Cemetery, and on a summer day, when this door was open, it was a pleasant sight to look out upon the peaceful scene – the stones, the green grass, the trees and shrubs. Squire Tyrrell and his family used to sit in a side pew near this door.”

William Watson Sr. who was a school teacher and later Superintendent of Schools in York Township, lived for a number of years until his death in 1883 in Weston, in a house on Church Street at the end of what Dr. Watson says they used to call “Catholic Lane.” This was in all probability George Street and the house was very likely one of those demolished in 1961 to make way for the erection of a apartment building on the north side of Church Street opposite George Street. William Watson, in addition to being Sunday School Superintendent, was a Local Preacher and also conducted a Sunday morning Class Meeting in the basement of the old church for many years. He was an active member of the Good Templar’s Lodge which also met in the church basement. His home was always open to the young ministers of the circuit who preached at Weston but who lived in Woodbridge.

According to Dr. Tyrrell, our second church was built by his father, the ‘Squire’, referred to by Dr. Watson. In 1875, following a fire which burned the Grammar School on King Street, classes were held in the basement of this church. The newly appointed principal at that time was Mr. Geo. Wallace, B.A., formerly a teacher at Upper Canada College, and he lived with Mr. Wm. Tyrrell.

Minutes of the Trustee Board meeting early in April, 1887 include a motion that the last Sabbath Services in the old church be the 17th. of April when the speakers were the Rev. R. Large ad R. P. Bowles, B.A. This was also reported ion the “Christian Guardian.” On the following evening an “Old Folks Concert” was held under the auspices of the Ladies Aid Society, which raised $90.00.

At the same meeting a committee was appointed to provide for places to hold Sabbath Services and class meetings, during the building of the new church. There appears to be no record of what accommodation was obtained.

Also at the April meeting – “Mr. Mallory appointed Architect for the new building erection.”

Minute for Mission

At the conclusion of her annual report (see above), Diana Stapleton included these important words:

Poverty is the root cause of the food insecurity that leads to food bank use. Inadequate social assistant and disability benefits negatively impact individuals in our community and across our country. COVID has laid bare the inadequacy of our social support systems. Remember to talk to your local politicians and tell them you want supports that will help raise people up so they can feed themselves and their families. Supports like affordable housing, universal childcare, living wage, accessible education, and training programs. Then maybe one day we can close our food bank. Until that day, thank you to everybody for supporting WAES.

Worth a Look

Black History Month: CBC has launched a new website called Being Black in Canada, a collection of stories, profiles, and archival material.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Dennis, Henry (?), house, Buttonwood Ave., at former end (now approx. Emmet Ave.,); chapel, looking east. Toronto, Ont.
Photo taken by James V. Salmon of the 1849 marker from our church. It was returned to Central in 1961 when the building (pictured) was demolished.

January 28, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png

This week! There will be a Communion Service (by Zoom) on Sunday, January 31 at noon. The General Council of the United Church has ruled that we can celebrate communion as long as it happens in “real time.” In other words, participants can tune in or dial in (Zoom also works on the telephone) and take communion along with everyone else on the call. You will need to provide your own elements, of course—normally the traditional bread and grape juice. If you can’t manage bread and grape juice, then any reasonable facsimile will do. A Zoom link will be sent to you on Sunday morning. If you are reading this email on your old Commodore 64, you might consider joining by phone (see below).

Some notes on our Zoom gathering (Sunday at noon). First, thanks to Faith for offering to be our host for the meeting. She will be greeting you as you arrive (we recommend five or so minutes early) and leading the “coffee time” after our brief service. No computer? No problem! You can add the Zoom app to your smartphone, or you can join Zoom by telephone with four easy steps!

1. To join by phone, choose a local number from the “Dial by your location” section of the Zoom invitation.  
2. Dial one of the 647 numbers and key in the Meeting ID when prompted, followed by the # key.
3. Ignore the request for a Participant ID and press # again.
4. Add the meeting Passcode and press #

You are now in the meeting.  Please note: you will be muted as you enter the meeting, and can unmute yourself by pressing *6

History this week: Deeds on the property finalized, manses bought and sold, saints disinterred, a tennis court created, and a parking lot is born. (see below)

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until February 11. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

Offering envelopes have arrived. If you wish to have them now, you can call Terry and we will arrange to have them dropped off. Or, you could wait until in-person worship resumes and pick them up then. Terry’s number of 416-417-1224.

Plan ahead! The administrative life of Central continues to unfold, with meetings planned and corresponding deadlines set. To that end, we can announce the Annual Meeting (by Zoom) scheduled for Sunday, March 21 at noon. Taye will be preparing the annual report, and needs individual reports by February 21. Sooner is better, of course, something this author will try to take to heart. 

The Church Council Executive will meet on Sunday, February 14 at 12.30 pm. 

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Psalm 111: “Great are the works of the LORD, studied by all who delight in them.”

Mark 1.21-28: “Be silent, and come out of him!”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

John prepares for takeoff. Photo by Donna Latimer

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

Copies of other deeds in our possession indicate that further lands were deeded to the Trustees of the Methodist Church in Weston; all by the name of John Davis Porter: Jan. 6th, 1844, “Eleven Perches” for 12 pounds, 10 shillings; Nov. 11th, 1852, “One Rood four Perches”. (Price not indicated); Jan. 1st, 1858, area not mentioned, for 40 pounds.

It is interesting to note that the transaction in 1844 was not registered at the time. Subsequently, in order to clear up the estate of John Davis Porter who “departed this life” on May 25th, 1874, the Trustees ad the widow, the surviving children and other interested parties, executed a Indenture dated Nov. 1st, 1876, releasing the property to the Trustees. This indenture was duly registered at 11.35 o’clock am of the 3rd day of July, A.D. 1877.

Another deed dated October 14th, 1880, conveyed to the Trustees by Robert S. Brown and William Brown, a parcel of land on King Street between the “Burying Ground” and the Grand Trunk Railway (now part of the Canadian National Railways) but not immediately adjacent to either of these. 0n this site a Parsonage was built for the Methodist Ministers. This was offered for sale in July, 1922, but the church advertisement in “The Times and Guide” dated December 27th of that year still showed 35 King Street as the residence of the Minister. It was sold in August, 1929, for $4,000.00 and another house purchased at 31 Queen’s Drive for $9,000.00. The mortgage on the latter property was paid off in 1934. The King Street house was incorporated in an apartment building still in use and known as “The Gables” In 1967, through a mutually agreeable arrangement between the Official Board ad the Rev. R.E.Spencer, the Queen’s Dr. Manse (note the change of designation) was sold for $27,500.00, ad Mr. Spencer bought a home of his own on Leggett Ave. in Etobicoke. The funds from this sale have bee invested to provide a return which is applied to the living allowance for the minister in lieu of a manse, or for the future purchase of another manse.

In 1919, after the necessary legislation had been passed by the Provincial Legislature to permit such action, the remains of those buried in the “Methodist Cemetery” were removed and re-interred in Riverdale Cemetery in Etobicoke, west of the Humber River. Minutes of a meeting of the Official Board dated Nov. 11th, 1919, make reference to this work being competed and payment for same was authorized. The amount was not named. In this connection the following excerpt from a history of this church entitled “From Methodist to United” written by an unknown public school student in 1951 (?) commented on the removal of the “cemetery” to Riverside ad continued: “However I don’t believe all the bodies were removed, since when Little Bros. bought some of this land and dug up some of the earth, I saw a skull on top of one of the trucks. I think this was very disrespectful and also it could have been the truck driver’s ancestor.,”

Subsequently tennis courts were laid out on this site (now part of the parking lot) and records indicate that $75.00 was granted to the “Young People” on May 3rd, 1921, and a further $40.00 on June 22nd of the sane year towards the cost of these courts. They were in active use until World War II. Later the site was used as a parking lot in an unimproved condition. In 1955, under an agreement with the Trustee Board, the Town of Weston lowered this ground to street level in order to proceed with the widening of King Street. At the same time a line of beautiful maple trees between the sidewalk and the fence came down. It is not clear whether or not these trees were actually on church property but it was later lamented by one Trustee that the Board did not require the Town to replace them at the tine. However, even had this been done, it is probable that some of them at least would have had to be removed when the 1957 additions were made to the church building. These additions, consisting of a Christian Education Centre, Chapel, Vestry, Church Office and other accommodations, now occupy a portion of the former “Burying Ground”, but a large part still serves as a parking area.

In 1966, the Trustees made an arrangement with the neighbouring supermarket to combine the church parking lot with that of the market, resulting in a very large lot to serve the needs of both. To accomplish this it was necessary to demolish the caretaker’s house which stood in the extreme southeast corner of the church property. It had been transferred to that site from its original location south of the church and facing on Main Street (Weston Road) where it was built, probably prior to 1900. Under the terms of the agreement, Steinburgs, at considerable expense, levelled, paved and lighted the entire parking area, and pays the church a monthly rental. Where the little house stood on Main Street there were driving sheds between it and the church, long since removed. South of the house was the old “Central Hotel” (a temperance House?) demolished in 1966 along with a large garage to make way for the supermarket.

Minute for Mission

There is no place like camp for campers and staff alike to live life to the fullest, experience the beauty and wonder of creation, and build meaningful relationships. Thanks to your gifts for Mission & Service, campers can continue to have meaningful experiences at camps like Camp McDougall in Thessalon, Ontario.

The Camp McDougall staff strive to have a positive effect on the lives of the young people spending time there, and they recognize the importance of their role in this experience and provide guidance, entertainment, leadership, example, and friendship. Making the most of this opportunity creates the ultimate camp experience for everyone.

As a United Church camp, Camp McDougall is an entity both rich in tradition and dedicated to encouraging new ideas. Throughout the years, many people have contributed a great deal of time and effort to make the camp what it is today. Board members, staff members, counsellors, and even campers have the potential to contribute to the ongoing development and success of this organization.

Camp McDougall is blessed with the raw materials for a great summer: a fantastic location on the shore of Lake Huron near Thessalon, Ontario; an enthusiastic and capable staff; and most important, lots of excited campers ready to experience the magic.

If Mission & Service giving is already a regular part of your life, thank you so much! If you have not given, please join me in making Mission & Service giving a regular part of your life of faith. Loving our neighbour is at the heart of our Mission & Service.

Worth a Look

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and The Cornell Lab of Ornithology presents bird songs, part of an interactive graphic. Turn up the volume on your device!

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

January 21, 2021

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is about-central.png

Plan ahead! The administrative life of Central continues to unfold, with meetings planned and corresponding deadlines set. To that end, we can announce the Annual Meeting (by Zoom) scheduled for Sunday, March 21 at noon. Taye will be preparing the annual report, and needs individual reports by February 21. Sooner is better, of course, something this author will try to take to heart.

Save the date! There will be a Communion Service (by Zoom) on Sunday, January 31 at noon. The General Council of the United Church has ruled that we can celebrate communion as long as it happens in “real time.” In other words, participants can tune in or dial in (Zoom also works on the telephone) and take communion along with everyone else on the call. You will need to provide your own elements, of course—normally the traditional bread and grape juice. If you can’t manage bread and grape juice, then any reasonable facsimile will do. If you have questions, send me a note.

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until February 11. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

Offering envelopes have arrived. If you wish to have them now, you can call Terry and we will arrange to have them dropped off. Or, you could wait until in-person worship resumes and pick them up then. Terry’s number of 416-417-1224.

The Church Council Executive will meet on Sunday, February 14 at 12.30 pm.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Psalm 62: “For God alone my soul waits in silence, for my hope is from God.”

Mark 1.14-20: “Follow me and I will make you fish for people.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

1907 sketch by Bernard Joseph Gloster (1878-1948)

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

An earlier history tells of James Lever having settled near the mouth of the Humber River and preaching to men in the Canadian Militia during the war of 1812. The story further details his contacting a fellow Methodist, John Denison, who was farming on land obtained by grant on the Humber River near what later became the southerly limits of Weston. Here are some signs of confusion for John Denison was an Anglican, although the reference to this property appears accurate since there still exists a Denison Family cemetery and a small chapel at that location. However, there was a Dennis who had a connection with the young Methodist congregation in Weston and who held land in the vicinity of the point where the recently extended Eglinton Avenue reaches the Humber River. It was from an old house on this site that the corner stone of our second church building (1849) was retrieved in 1961.

The story then traces Lever’s move from the mouth of the river to a place about two miles north of Denison’s farm, which would put it in the vicinity of the present Weston Road and Wilson Avenue. Here he is reported to have built a log home and a log meeting house where services were held. This may have been so, but our more recent and fairly authenticated information rules out the possibility of such meetings being held as early as 1812.

We have in our possession an uncertified (Typewritten) copy of a “Memorial” bearing two dates: “20th March, 1821 and “11th June, 1821”, which appears to be a trust deed by which Elizabeth Davis and John Davis Porter granted to seven trustees an acre of land at the corner of what later became King and Main Streets (the latter having been changed to Weston Road as recently as 1960), “in trust that they shall erect a house for public worship for the use of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the Province of Upper Canada” . The trustees were Michael Miller, Thomas Hill, Caleb Peck, James Farr, Erastus Howard, Nathan Martin and Robert Farr.

Provision was made that as any one or more of these trustees died or ceased to be a member of the said church, the Minister or Preacher should call a meeting to elect one or more persons to fill the vacancy or vacancies in order to keep the number of 7 trustees forever. (The number of trustees of the present congregation is 12.)

Elizabeth Davis was the widow of Benjamin Davis and John Davis Porter appears to have been a ward or an employee of Benjamin at the time he executed his last will and testament dated October l5th, 1818. John Porter married Louisa Longstaff on April 21st, 1825, and one of their nine children, Mary Porter, born on October 29th, 1837, married Robert S. Brown on October 1st, 1856. Direct descendants of this union are among the present members of this congregation.

Minute for Mission

Thanks to everyone who contributed to the Mission and Service Fund in 2020. We raised $11,896, only $104 short of our 2020 goal of $12,000. In a year that say a disruption to our regular giving patterns, this number is a great accomplishment. On behalf of the Outreach Committee, thank you!

Worth a Look

One of the many highlights of the Biden inauguration was this poem by Amanda Gorman, 22 year-old youth poet laureate of the United States.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

January 14, 2021

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Photo by Donna Latimer

Save the date! There will be a Communion Service (by Zoom) on Sunday, January 31 at 12 pm. The General Council of the United Church has ruled that we can celebrate communion as long as it happens in “real time.” In other words, participants can tune in or dial in (Zoom also works on the telephone) and take communion along with everyone else on the call. You will need to provide your own elements, of course—normally the traditional bread and grape juice. If you can’t manage bread and grape juice, then any reasonable facsimile will do. If you have questions, send me a note.

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until February 11. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

We received a very kind note from Diana Stapleton at WAES. Read it below.

Today: The Outreach Committee will meet (by Zoom) on Thursday, January 14 at 6 pm.

A couple of publication notes: If you would like to receive the Upper Room, we have limited quantities available, which we will mail out upon request. Simply reply to this email. Also, Broadview Magazine (formerly The Observer) goes out to a number of households by group subscription. If you receive it, we humbly ask you to consider an $25 donation to offset the cost to the congregation. If you would like to be added to the list, let me know.

Offering envelopes have arrived. If you wish to have them now, you can call Terry and we will arrange to have them dropped off. Or, you could wait until in-person worship resumes and pick them up then. Terry’s number of 416-417-1224.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

1 Samuel 3.1-10: “Speak, LORD, for your servant is listening.”

Psalm 139: “I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made.”

John 1.43-46: “Can anything good come out of Nazareth?”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Thanks from WAES

Diana Stapleton sends along her thanks:

Thank you for your ongoing donations and overall amazing support for WAES.  We literally could not be open if it weren’t for your generosity and the space we have in the church. Financial donations are critical to WAES remaining open for service, but even more so is our space. We continue to prepare hampers with a limited crew and then distribute the food outside for safety.  

December is always a busy time at WAES.  This past year is certainly no exception.  In past years 50+ volunteers spent 2 days picking up, organizing and bagging food for people for our Holiday Hampers. Due to COVID we had to set up a new system.  Every day from Dec. 14 to 24 we had three shifts of volunteers (6 at a time) to do the same work.  We distributed turkeys, halal chicken, veggies, fruits, cheese, milk, personal care items and a variety of treats.  During the last week before Christmas, we distributed food that will feed over 900 people, about 350 are children and 100 are seniors.  This represents over 10,000 pounds of food.  Since COVID began WAES has averaged 2,200 visits each month.  This is up from an average of 640 visits during 2019.  We do not see the volume of those in need going down in the near future.  

WAES continues to find new volunteers, new support from local retailers and generous donors.  This support will keep us open. We could not do this without the help of wonderful people like you. Thank you for walking with us on this journey. Stay safe and stay healthy.  A tax receipt will be issued in early February.

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. This excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

One story built around the personal history of Mr. James Lever (one of our founders) sets 1812 as the year in which that ardent Methodist, an immigrant from Lancashire, England, commenced holding meetings and preaching services somewhat north of what was the northerly limit of the Town of Weston., This would be roughly in the vicinity of Weston Road and Wilson Avenue. However, in the obituary of James Lever in the September 1861 issue of “The Christian Guardian”, a Methodist publication of some years standing at that time, it was stated that Mr. Lever was born in England in 1769, was converted in 1815, and left England in 1817. He lived in Philadelphia for some few months and a son (Roger) was apparently born there in 1818. The Levers moved to “Upper Canada” that year ad settled in Champion’s “The Methodist Churches of Toronto “ (1899) and in Sanderson’s “First Century of Methodism in Canada” (1908), in connection with the building of the first chapel on King Street on the site now occupied by the head office building of the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in Toronto.

Champion’s story sets the date of the opening service in this building as November 5th, 1818, at which time the preacher was the Reverend David Culp. He had been appointed to the Yonge Street Circuit in 1817 and was also the first regular minister to serve the new Weston church. The first congregation in York was apparently connected with the American Methodist Episcopal Church ad soon after the little chapel on King Street was opened a number of Wesleyan Methodists, including the Levers, left it to hold their own meetings in the Masonic Hall.

The Rev. Henry Pope, a Wesleyan Missionary from England, arrived in York in 1820 to minister to this little group but left again the same year. Some members of the Wesleyan Society as it was known, again including the Levers, returned to the King Street Chapel in that year.

The Guardian’s story states that Mr. Lever moved about five(?) miles from York in 1821 and “selected Weston as his place of worship but retained his office for a while as Superintendent of the Sabbath School in York”. James Lever, in his petition for land, dated July 24th, 1818, to the Government of Upper Canada (a photostatic copy of which we obtained from the Public Archives of Canada) makes reference to his immigration to Upper Canada in 1817. While not named as one of the original Trustees, we believe he was one of the active founders of the Weston Church. He served some 40 years as Sunday School Superintendent and did some lay preaching on the circuit. A son, John, became an ordained minister but there is no record of his having served the Weston Church.

Minute for Mission

Thanks to everyone who contributed to the Mission and Service Fund in 2020. We raised $11,896, only $104 short of our 2020 goal of $12,000. In a year that say a disruption to our regular giving patterns, this number is a great accomplishment. On behalf of the Outreach Committee, thank you!

Worth a Look

A bit of local history: a look at the history of Rexdale from BlogTO.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove

January 7, 2021

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Central circa 1953

Happy Anniversary! As 2021 begins, we celebrate 200 years of Central and 200 years at the corner of Weston Road and King. As you would expect, the beginning of our celebration is muted, with the pandemic restricting our ability to get together and truly celebrate. To that end, you Church Council Executive has decided to begin the “anniversary year” in the fall, with events and dates still somewhat tentative. So watch this space. In the meantime, we can look forward to an anniversary greeting from the Moderator (in March) and a public event in partnership with Shakespeare in Action and the Weston Historical Society (perhaps in September). Also, the blast will have anniversary elements throughout the year, beginning today (see below).

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until January 20. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

Events in Washington yesterday were disturbing and sad, and I struggle to find the words to respond. My dear friend Abigail Johnson sent along this poem by Danna Faulds, called The Pendulum Swings:

Have patience. The pendulum
that swung too far in one
direction will swing back.
At the moment of its turning,
everything hangs in the balance.
All the momentum of past actions
is suspended in mid-air, and
those who care about what
happens next are poised with it.

There is a long and anxious
pause before the motion shifts,
and then a sense of free fall,
when the world is turned on
its head and nothing is known
or normal. Have patience then,
and do not rush to either extreme.
The way will paint its own arrows
on the trees if you can wait for clarity.

The Church Council Executive will meet (by Zoom) on Sunday, January 10 at 12.30 pm.

The Outreach Committee will meet (also by Zoom) on Thursday, January 14 at 6 pm.

A couple of publication notes: If you would like to receive the Upper Room, we have limited quantities available, which we will mail out upon request. Simply reply to this email. Also, Broadview Magazine (formerly The Observer) goes out to a number of households by group subscription. If you receive it, we humbly ask you to consider an $25 donation to offset the cost to the congregation. If you would like to be added to the list, let me know.

Offering envelopes have arrived. If you wish to have them now, you can call Terry and we will arrange to have them dropped off. Or, you could wait until in-person worship resumes and pick them up then. Terry’s number of 416-417-1224.

Email woes? Some have noted missing services or blasts, and the problem seems elusive. We have recently upgraded the security on the site, but the internet may need time to notice. One suggestion: if you haven’t received a mailing, check your spam folder. Sometimes email programs are extra cautious about mass mailings. Also note: the weekly service is always available at oneking.ca/wp

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 or you can give to Central online with CanadaHelps.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Psalm 29: “Ascribe to the LORD, O heavenly beings, ascribe to the LORD glory and strength.”

Acts 19.1-7: “John baptized with the baptism of repentance, telling the people to believe in the one who was to come after him, that is, in Jesus.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Donna’s grandson and son-in-law visit the Humber

Central at 200

Part of our celebration is to catalog the history of Central and the congregations woven into our fabric. Earlier this year, Marlene, Sylvia, Kerri, and Kevin assisted in transcribing and digitizing our existing history books, from 1971 and 1996. Today we begin presenting highlights. The first excerpt is found in the book “From Methodist Episcopal and Wesleyan Methodist to Central United” (1971) by Stanley Musselwhite:

In the sincere belief that Central United would be celebrating its One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary in 1962, a Committee was appointed by the Official Board in 1961 to make plans for the celebration of this important milestone in the life of our congregation.

One of the first things the Committee decided was the necessity for the establishment of reasonable proof for the age of the church. A considerable amount of research failed to substantiate the year 1812 which had generally been accepted as the date of its founding. However, so much information concerning the early years of the church and some of the people connected with it down through the years was collected, much of it previously unknown or forgotten, and very little of it available in any assembled form, that these notes have been combined and expanded into a story which may be accepted as an authentic history.

In the light of this information, the Official Board of Central at its October meeting in 1961, adopted a recommendation of the Committee that the year 1821 (the year in which the acre of land was donated on which a small chapel was subsequently built) be recognized as the year in which the church was founded. It is reasonable to assume that there was some form of organization in existence prior to that year, or, at least that some informal meetings or services were held. Diligent search has failed, however, to uncover any reliable references which would authenticate as earlier date.

Acceptance of the year 1821 as its founding date makes this church, we believe, the second oldest of Methodist origin in Metropolitan Toronto. The first church of this denomination in “York” was erected on King Street just west of Yonge Street in 1818. Metropolitan United (formerly referred to as “The Cathedral of Methodism”) claims succession from this first chapel. However, two other former Methodist congregations, Thornhill United and Washington United (Scarborough) apparently began in 1803 and1805 respectively.

Some confusion has existed through past years as to our founding date. Calendars in our archives refer to the celebration of the 111th and 113th anniversaries n 1933 and 1935, which would make the birth date 1822, but the calendar for December 2nd, 1956, refers to the 144th anniversary, putting the date back to 1812. This date was put on the corner stone at the new entrance in 1957. Records indicate that Special Thanksgiving services were held on October 27th, 1912, to mark the 25th Anniversary of the third building which was erected in 1887. One might have expected that the 100th Anniversary of the founding of the congregation would have been recognized at the same time, if this fact were known. Incidentally, no record has been located of any recognition being given to the one Hundredth Birthday of the church at any time during the first quarter of this century.

Minute for Mission

Across Canada, more than 12,800 opioid-related deaths occurred between January 2016 and March 2019. Eighty-two percent of accidental opioid-related deaths involved fentanyl or fentanyl analogues. Likely every church and community that reads this Minute for Mission has been affected by drug poisoning. Vancouver’s inner city has been profoundly shaken by this pandemic. Public education, access to harm reduction supplies, and safe consumption sites have begun to slowly reduce the numbers. We advocate for change in drug policy, increased housing, easier access to treatment facilities, and more supports for those who struggle with mental illness.

Your support for Mission & Service allows First United Church in Vancouver and other community ministries to continue a ministry of seeking justice and holding space for life.

Worth a Look

One of my favourite Golden Age painters is Clara Peeters, perhaps the greatest still life painter in Dutch painting. Donna’s picture last week, where you could see her reflection, is classic Clara Peeters.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Part of our history is recent, but old in digital terms. Here is a screenshot from year two of the email blast. In year one, the blast was literally an email, with a photo added for a bit of colour.

December 31, 2020

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What has five letters beginning with A-N-G? Angus and angel!

Happy New Year! From the elders and staff at Central, we wish you many blessings for 2021.

In-person services cancelled. Recently the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until January 20. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted.

Check your email for our weekly service, sent out around 8 am on Sunday. 

So many people to thank! To everyone who helped with worship, to everyone who helped with events and occasions at WKNC and the food bank, to those who helped at CKSR. We are blessed with many opportunities to help others, and many dedicated people to do the helping.

Chris from WAES food bank gave us the count for Christmas hampers: 300 households and 900 individuals helped in just two days of distribution. He writes: “Thank you for your continued interest and support of WAES, and hosting our organization in your church. Central has been and continues to make it possible for WAES to keep up with the overwhelming demand for aid in our community.”

Email woes? Some have noted missing services or blasts, and the problem seems elusive. We have recently upgraded the security on the site, but the internet may need time to notice. One suggestion: if you haven’t received a mailing, check your spam folder. Sometimes email programs are extra cautious about mass mailings. Also note: the weekly service is always available at oneking.ca/wp

The last day to make a donation in 2020 is January 7, 2021. You read that right.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 and the link to our online giving platform is the following:

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Psalm 147: “He sends out his word, and melts them; he makes his wind blow, and the waters flow.”

Ephesians 1.3-14: “With all wisdom and insight he has made known to us the mystery of his will.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

A festive shot from the intrepid Donna Latimer. If you look closely, you can see her in the reflection.

Minute for Mission

Farmers learn best from one another. The Organization of African Instituted Churches (OAIC) supports farmer-to-farmer knowledge exchange through interactive model farms. OAIC is one of our long- standing Mission & Service–funded global partners. The farmer-to- farmer project would not exist without your gifts to Mission & Service.

The model farms in West Pokot, Kenya, give rural farmers opportunities to physically demonstrate and teach each other appropriate technologies and new methods. Depending on what’s being tested or showcased,
the demonstration farm could have different types of crops and crop varieties, livestock or poultry breeds, fertilizer treatments, or technology such as drip irrigation.

One of OAIC’s initiatives is to promote chicken farming to farms that are subject to extreme weather or aren’t large enough to raise cattle. Women in particular have taken to raising chickens to boost their household income and also for the eggs, a good source of protein for their families.

Well-presented demonstrations enable farmers to see for themselves how the new technology works; small-scale farmers adopting new methods are taught how to cope with and manage ongoing agricultural challenges, climate change, and food insecurity. Again, the farmer-to- farmer project would not exist without your gifts to Mission & Service.

Worth a Look

I’m never quite sure how they decide, but here are the 16 Outstanding Images From The World’s Best Photos Of Work 2020 Agora Contest from Forbes. Also gets the nod for most awkward magazine headline.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Mark Bisgrove took this shot on Christmas Day.

December 22, 2020

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The narthex on Thursday as the WAES food bank prepared to distribute for Christmas. Friday saw over 400 people receive help, with an equal number expected this week.

In-Person Christmas Eve services cancelled. Last week, the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until January 20. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted.

Check your email for the Christmas Eve service, to be sent out at 4 pm on Thursday. Also, Sunday is the First Sunday of Christmas. Look for a link at the usual time, around 8 am.

Many thanks to everyone who took part in the Christmas Coffeehouse! The informal Christmas decoration contest was an unexpected, yet pleasant, part of the hour.

Sylvia shared the news that approximately 150 hampers will be given out by WKNC on December 24. Patricia Crooks is requesting additional assistance starting at 11 am tomorrow (December 23) to prepare the hampers. Unfortunately, only those 60 and under may apply. Effort will be made to social distance as much as possible. Please call Patricia at 416-241-9898 to volunteer. 

Email woes? Some have noted missing services or blasts, and the problem seems elusive. We have recently upgraded the security on the site, but the internet may need time to notice. One suggestion: if you haven’t received a mailing, check your spam folder. Sometimes email programs are extra cautious about mass mailings. Also note: the weekly service is always available at oneking.ca/wp

The last day to make a donation in 2020 is January 7, 2021. You read that right.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 and the link to our online giving platform is the following:

Photo by Donna Latimer

Speaking of Donna’s photo, it also appeared in Paul Ivany’s My Daily Minute from Norval United Church, a daily devotional email that is definitely worth a look. Paul’s email usually arrives by 5 am, a great way to start the day. You can subscribe here.

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

Readings this week:

Galatians 4.4-7: “When the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman.”

Psalm 96: “For great is the LORD, and greatly to be praised; to be revered above all gods.”

Matthew 1.18-25: “She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.”

Psalm 148: “Praise him, all his angels; praise him, all his host!”

Luke 2.22-32: “When the time came for their purification according to the law of Moses, they brought him up to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Minute for Missions

Gifts with Vision is back! Tired of buying goats for your friends? Gifts with Vision supports Mission & Service Fund partners, providing over $3 million in extra support since 2011. An example:

The LGBTIQ2S+ Solidarity Fund strives to advance the rights, dignity, and inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, intersex, queer, and Two-Spirit people around the world. This work is crucial, since homosexual activity is still illegal in 68 countries and rates of violence perpetrated against trans people worldwide are alarmingly high. The fund has supported international consultations with religious leaders, safe shelters, and sponsorships of LGBTQ+ refugees to Canada. A portion of the fund will be endowed to ensure sustainability. Your gift of $50 will advance the rights of LGBTIQ2S+ people around the world.

Visit giftswithvision.ca to learn more.

Worth a Look

If you enjoyed the stamps on Sunday, you might enjoy this article, entitled O Christmas stamp! From Santa to a Huron Madonna, the story of the Christmas stamp is a story of Canada.

Worth a Look II

Thanks to Judith for sending along a little Newfoundland Christmas humour for 2020: Mummers, nice mummers, get lost.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

A cold day on Cross Street

December 17, 2020

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Faith, Sylvia, Jagada, and Donna help serve dinner on Tuesday. Will Donna’s hat be THE fashion trend for 2021?

The WKNC Christmas Dinner was a success! Sylvia writes: “Thank you to Patricia Crooks, De’Janna Mignott,  and everyone who assisted in making the Church/WKNC Christmas dinner on Dec. 15, a success. A delicious meal co-ordinated by Gerry Maddison was served from the Weston King door to 75 participants. Elizabeth Rodgerson co-ordinated the turkey cookers and the turkey per usual looked very moist and inviting.  Donna Latimer provided delicious cake as customary.  Patricia had hoped to serve approximately 150 participants and had advertised well but she attributed the cold weather to the fewer numbers. However, this allowed for the left over meals to be given to participants for lunch the following day.”

Sylvia also noted that approximately 150 hampers will be given out by WKNC on December 24. Patricia Crooks is requesting additional assistance starting at 11 am on December 22 and 23 to prepare the hampers. Unfortunately, only those 60 and under may apply. Effort will be made to social distance as much as possible. Please call Patricia at 416-241-9898 to volunteer. 

In-Person Christmas Eve services cancelled. Last week, the Ontario government extended all COVID-19 restrictions until January 20. While churches are not technically closed, we are limited to 10 people in worship. The Church Council Executive looked at this limitation, and the need to keep people safe, and decided to cancel public worship until these restrictions are lifted. We remain hopeful that the numbers will be better next month. In response to this disappointing turn-of-events, we have decided to create a virtual opportunity to gather, at our Zoom Coffeehouse scheduled for Sunday (December 20) at noon. There will be readings, musical performances, and a chance to wish others a Merry Christmas. The Zoom invitation will go out with the service link, at 8 am on Sunday.

Thank you to everyone who donated food to WAES. Thousands of pounds of food will be distributed tomorrow (December 18) and Tuesday. There is still an opportunity to drop off food items on Monday (9 am to noon). Suggestions include canned tomatoes, pasta sauce, canned vegetables, crackers, rice in either 750 or 900g bags, diapers and formula.

Email woes? Some have noted missing services or blasts, and the problem seems elusive. We have recently upgraded the security on the site, but the internet may need time to notice. One suggestion: if you haven’t received a mailing, check your spam folder. Sometimes email programs are extra cautious about mass mailings. Also note: the weekly service is always available at oneking.ca/wp

The last day to make a donation in 2020 is January 7, 2021. You read that right.

The Church Council Executive continues to monitor the financial picture at Central. PAR is a blessing for us, along with those who have mailed in their offering or made a contribution online. We encourage you to help in any way you can, and we will even send someone to pick up your donation if you can’t get out to the mailbox. We thank you for your continued support. The mailing address is 1 King Street, Weston, Ontario, M9N 1K8 and the link to our online giving platform is the following:

Photo by Judith Hayes. She notes that it was the first night of Hanukkah, as if God was lighting the first candle!

Worship at Central

Worship is currently online only. If you receive this blast, you will also receive an online service, around 8 am on Sunday.

This Sunday’s Readings:

Isaiah 9.2, 6-7: “The people walking in darkness have seen a great light.”

Matthew 2.1-2: “Where is the one who has been born king of the Jews? We saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him.”

Read last week’s sermon. Did you miss a service, or misplace the link? Our services will remain online for you to review and enjoy. Click oneking.ca/wp to visit our worship site.

Photo by Donna Latimer

Minute for Missions

Gifts with Vision is back! Tired of buying goats for your friends? Gifts with Vision supports Mission & Service Fund partners, providing over $3 million in extra support since 2011. An example:

For people who live in poverty, a bicycle offers inexpensive, reliable transportation to work, school, errands, and appointments—which makes bicycle repair an essential service. Bill’s Community Bike Shop at Saint Columba House in the Pointe-Saint-Charles neighbourhood of Montreal, QC offers affordable reconditioned bikes, parts, tune-ups, and workshops for low-income individuals so they can safely travel where they need to go. Your Gift of $50 will help one person get where they need to go by purchasing a reconditioned bicycle for them.

Visit giftswithvision.ca to learn more.

Also, the Moderator of the United Church, the Rt. Rev. Richard Bott, sends Christmas greetings.

Worth a Look

Shauna sent along word of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra’s twist on The Messiah. In partnership with Against the Grain Theatre, the work will be presented as a 80 minute video, filled in various location across Canada. There is even a segment filmed at Weston Lions Arena. There is a sample on YouTube, with Deantha Edmunds singing, “Kuvianattuksovut Itigangit” (“How Beautiful are the Feet”) in Inuktitut. You can watch the complete performance here.

Worth a Look, Part Two

A couple of weeks back, the service included some images from a Bruegel painting called The Sermon of Saint John the Baptist (1566). The Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest, has created a detailed look at the painting, with explanations. See it here.

About this Blast

Members and friends receive this blast every Thursday. To share an announcement or unsubscribe, email cuc@bellnet.ca

Territorial Acknowledgement

Our location on the historic Carrying Place Trail (Weston Road) reminds us that we meet on the traditional territory of the Huron-Wendat, Petun, Seneca and, most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit. We hope this ancient path will be a symbol of our desire to walk with Indigenous peoples in a spirit of reconciliation and respect.

Contact Us

Central United Church, 1 King Street, Weston, ON M9N 1K8 | Phone: (416) 241-7544

Photo by Mark Bisgrove